2022 NFL Draft Big Board: A pair of quarterbacks help round out the Top 50

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We have reached the single digits in the countdown to draft day. I posted my top 25 players on Monday. I am continuing those rankings here.

A few things to note about how I do my big boards. I rank the best players in the class based on talent and ability to translate to the NFL, not necessarily where they will be drafted. Let’s use Malik Willis as an example. I expect him to be drafted well above where I have him ranked, but that is because the league puts a premium on the position he plays. Same thing goes for Kyle Hamilton, but in reverse. He is a top-five player in this draft class, but he will probably drop out of the top 10 on draft day because the NFL does not value safeties as highly.

26. Tyler Linderbaum, C, Iowa
One of the best interior linemen in this class, Linderbaum was a lot higher on my board prior to the pre draft process. He fell well short of the measurables you want from an NFL offensive linemen, ranking in the first percentile for wingspan and arm length, the fifth percentile for weight and the sixth percentile for height. That does not mean he cannot translate to the next level, but it does point to him being a bit more limited with what we can expect, especially as a run blocker. He still has incredible athleticism for the position and the drive to finish blocks. Since 2010, there have been no centers drafted in the first round that weighed under 300 pounds. Linderbaum weighs 296 pounds.

27. Quay Walker, LB, Georgia
One of my favorite prospects in this class, appearing on my draft crushes list for 2022 as well, Walker is a rangy linebacker with great size and instincts. He ran well at the combine, which backed up the speed you see watching him on film. He has true sideline-to-sideline capability. He is a plus in coverage as well. While he did not produce much as a pass rusher, he is still an effective blitzer when his number is called. All-around solid linebacker with great traits. I think he will fit into just about any defense at the NFL level.

28. George Karlaftis, EDGE, Purdue
One of the most exciting edge rushers in this draft class, Karlaftis flashes all kinds of a pass rush ability on film. The biggest challenge for NFL teams will be getting him to produce consistently. His technique as a rusher is all over the place and his run defense leaves a lot to be desired. So far, he has not been able to match his freshman season where he posted 7.5 sacks, totaling just five in his final 15 collegiate games. He measured in with shorter than ideal arms as well, but that is something he can overcome with his speed and quickness off the line. There is a lot of room for growth, which should see him go in the first round.

29. Treylon Burks, WR, Arkansas
This is one of the trickiest evaluations of this draft process. On film, Burks showcased impressive playmaking skills with an exciting blend of size and speed. He posted impressive numbers for the Razorbacks, eclipsing 1,100 yards receiving to go with 11 touchdowns. He torched Alabama for 179 yards and two scores. That being said, he also had four games this season where he was held under 50 yards receiving, including a 16-yard outing against LSU and a 10-yard day when facing Georgia. That paired with a lackluster 40-time and a disappointing three-cone time and you get to where we are now. He could end up being a really solid playmaker, but there are a couple of red flags.

30. Nakobe Dean, LB, Georgia
Another Georgia defender makes the top 50. Dean is an explosive playmaker who excels playing downhill as a blitzing linebacker. He is decent in coverage and shows good range in run defense. He is a bit undersized at 5’11”, which is one of the only real knocks on Dean. If he can continue to play with good technique and capitalize on his speed, I think he will still be successful. There will be some teams who will not have him high on their boards because of his size. I think he can still be a solid starter with the capability to contribute right away.

31. Arnold Ebiketie, EDGE, Penn State
Another edge rusher still learning to play the sport, Ebiketie’s draft stock skyrocketed in his one season at Penn State after transferring from Temple. He only started playing football during his sophomore year of high school. He didn’t start at Temple until 2020, but did enough to impress James Franklin and his staff. It paid off with 9.5 sacks and 18 tackles for loss during his redshirt senior season. He is a bit small by NFL defensive end standards at about 6’3″, 250 pounds, but he has ideal length and impressive athleticism. However, he is one of the older prospects in the draft, having turned 23 in January. He is going to be a very scheme specific fit early on unless he can learn to play in more of an outside linebacker role.

32. Kaiir Elam, CB, Florida
Another player that I have struggled in evaluating, Elam checks a lot of boxes for what I look for in a corner. He is tall at 6’1″ and ran sub 4.4 for his 40 time. He excels in press man with solid length and good fluidity in his movement. I can see him being a really good fit for any team that runs a lot of Cover 1 or Cover 0 sets. So that’s the good news. The bad news is he struggles in zone coverage and has some work to do as an open-field tackler. He won’t be a fit for everyone, but if lands in the right spot, he could be a starter on the outside right away.

33. Trey McBride, TE, Colorado State
The first tight end to appear on my big board, McBride is a bit of a mix between new age and old school when it comes to the position. He is capable of lining up split out on the boundary, in the slot or inline next to the tackle as a receiver. He posted ridiculous numbers this past season with 90 receptions for over 1,100 yards, practically unheard of for a college tight end. What’s more, he is an above average blocker with solid speed. He was clocked running somewhere in the mid 4.5s at his pro day. He might not be on the same level as Kyle Pitts, but he is scheme versatile. I think he has Pro Bowl potential.

34. Jaquan Brisker, S, Penn State
Kyle Hamilton gets all the publicity, but this is a deep class of safeties. Brisker is one of a few I expect to see drafted in the second round come draft day. He is big at 6’1″ and he tested well at the combine. He flies around the field on his tape, making plays from a variety of positions in Penn State’s defense. I think he has the physicality and instincts to play strong safety and the range to play free safety. That versatility will be coveted at the next level.

35. Christian Watson, WR, North Dakota State
NDSU is becoming quite the breeding ground for NFL talent. Watson should be the latest player to earn his way to the next level. He is a rare combination of size and speed, measuring in at 6’4″ and running a 4.36 40-yard dash at the combine. He is a bit limited as a route runner, but he showcased his ability to win in one-on-one coverage at the Senior Bowl. There will be some growing pains as he continues to improve his hands and quickness, but the potential for him to become a matchup nightmare is enticing.

36. Kenny Pickett, QB, Pittsburgh
The next quarterback to come up on my board, Pickett is the most pro ready passer of this group. He has a good arm, a consistent throwing motion and the mobility needed to succeed in today’s NFL. He took a massive leap in his development during his redshirt senior season at Pittsburgh. His completion percentage jumped six points and he threw for more touchdowns (42) than he did in his first four seasons (39). Was he a one-season wonder? Only time will tell. There are a few other concerns with Pickett as well. He has the smallest hands in the league, which could prove to be an issue when the weather gets cold late in the season. He will also turn 24 this June. It is hard to tell exactly how much more room for growth there is.

37. George Pickens, WR, Georgia
One of the most tantalizing prospects in this draft class, Pickens is a bit of an unknown. He had a fantastic freshman season in a limited role before turning in a much more muted sophomore campaign. Expecting a big junior season, he tore his ACL in spring practice, but worked his way back to appear in the final few games of the season. He only recorded five catches in those four games. He posted solid, but not spectacular numbers at the combine, but the fact that he participated gave a good indication that he is back to full strength. Pickens has the body type and skill set to be a No. 1 receiver. It will be on whatever team drafts him though to help him take that next step in his development.

38. Desmond Ridder, QB, Cincinnati
Ridder is not just a fairy tale story anymore. Cincinnati showed it truly belonged in 2021, even if they did come up short against Alabama in the College Football Playoff. Ridder showcased in that game both what makes him an enticing prospect and why he is a bit of a project. He stood in against a heavy rush all night and delivered some solid passes outside the numbers. Unfortunately, we also saw him struggle to adjust when his passes were getting batted down at the line and his inaccuracy over the middle became a problem. There is a lot to like about his leadership, mobility and arm strength, but it will take time for him to put them all together.

39. Lewis Cine, S, Georgia
Yet another Georgia player. Kirby Smart sure knows how to recruit and develop NFL talent. Cine was already on the NFL’s radar, but he really caught the nation’s attention with the performance he put on in the National Championship Game against Alabama. He racked up seven tackles, including one for loss against the Tide, making plays in space the whole game long. It capped off a season where he recorded 73 tackles and showcased his speed. He has great size for the position and checks just about every box from a physical standpoint.

40. Boye Mafe, EDGE, Minnesota
An up-and-coming pass rusher in this draft class, Mafe turned in a seven-sack performance in his senior season. He is a speed rusher who flashes moments of power on film. His quick first step makes him tough to combat for slower tackles. He also showed that he can drop into coverage in both man and zone on film, so I think he could comfortably play outside linebacker at the next level. Mafe is also very comfortable playing with his hand in the ground as a defensive end. He has some room to improve as a run defender, but I think he will find his way onto the field early in his career.

41. Bernhard Raimann, OT, Central Michigan
Raimann feels like an athlete who just so happens to play offensive tackle. He put together a very impressive workout at the combine, dominating the three-cone, broad jump and bench press. My biggest knock on him would be his arm length, which was a bit below average. Still, I think he has the athleticism to make up for that. There will be a bit of a learning curve jumping from Central Michigan to facing NFL talent every week, but he has the look of a future starter in the league, especially if he can fill out his frame a bit more.

42. Sean Rhyan, OL, UCLA
Another college tackle whose future likely lies at interior lineman, Rhyan is close to NFL ready. He has good play strength and is a clear asset as a run blocker. He does sometimes lack a clear plan in the ground game, which leads him to miss a few blocks. Additionally, he does a solid job of keeping pass rushers in front of him. Unfortunately, he lacks the length to likely survive at tackle, but he could be a potential backup at the position given his history there in college.

43. Kyler Gordon, CB, Washington
NFL teams should probably just set up scouting posts in Seattle, because Washington continues to produce NFL caliber defensive backs. Elijah Molden, Byron Murphy, Taylor Rapp, Marcus Peters, Budda Baker and Kevin King are some of the more famous Huskies in the NFL right now. But I digress. Gordon seems poised to join that group, with recent buzz suggesting he might not get out of the first round. He is a bit bigger than his teammate Trent McDuffie at 5’11” and a half. However, he lacks the same kind of explosiveness that makes McDuffie such a coveted prospect. He shows a willingness as a run blocker. The more I watch him, the more I think I might be a little too low on him.

44. Breece Hall, RB, Iowa State
At long last, we have a running back in the rankings. Hall is a well-rounded back with potential home run speed. He broke 4.4 on his 40-time and had a really impressive workout all the way around. On top of that, his production at Iowa State was impressive. He scored 50 touchdowns on the ground and hauled in 83 catches over three years. He will certainly be a factor in the passing game even if he isn’t quite on the same level as Christian McCaffrey or Alvin Kamara. To me, he is the clear top back in this class and could even sneak into the end of Round 1 if a team like Buffalo decides it needs an upgrade in the backfield.

45. Jahan Dotson, WR, Penn State
This is a really tough one for me. From a production standpoint, I think Dotson is closer to a first-round pick. He has a great set of hands and posted over 1,100 yards on 90 catches with 12 touchdowns. The measurables are where I start to have an issue. He is only 5’10” and weighed in under 180 pounds at the combine. He also posted a dismal three-cone time. I think he can still be a very productive player at the next level, but I don’t know that he will ever be a true No. 1 option, which pushes him into the second round for me.

46. Darian Kinnard, OL, Kentucky
At this point, it is tough to project exactly where Kinnard will best fit in the NFL. He started three years at right tackle for Kentucky. However, he tested really poorly at the combine, showing he might lack to requisite athleticism to play tackle at the next level. That being said, he has long 35-inch arms and massive 11-inch hands. Those are incredible numbers. His play style probably points to a future on the interior, but only time will tell. Either way, I think he has a future as an NFL lineman with his raw power and size.

47. Cameron Thomas, EDGE, San Diego State
Thomas broke out in his junior season, recording 20.5 tackles for loss and 10.5 sacks. He has really solid play strength, which allows him to sort through traffic well against the run. San Diego State asked him to play inside a lot more than I think he will at the NFL level. He will likely be a 4-3 defensive end. He still has a lot of work to do as a pass rusher as he mostly wins reps based on effort at this point. The one thing he does really well as a pass rusher is use his hands to create leverage. If he starts adding a few moves, he will be a very effective player.

48. Tariq Woolen, CB, UTSA
Definitely a bit of a project, Woolen has exciting intangibles. He showed out at the combine, measuring in at just over 6’4″ before running a 4.26 40 and a 42-inch vertical. Mix in roughly 33 and a half-inch long arms and you have the makings of a potential superstar at the position. It is all going to depend on his development. He had a good year at UTSA and has a good understanding of how to break up passes without getting called for interference. I think I would like to see him get a bit more physical and improve when it comes to mirroring receivers. He is a really exciting prospect though.

49. Daniel Faalele, OT, Minnesota
One of the largest human beings to ever be at the combine, Faalele became the heaviest player to weigh in over 20 years. He tipped the scales at 384 pounds. At 6’8″, he carries that weight pretty well, but those numbers are just mind boggling. That size alone makes him an asset, but it comes with its drawbacks. He lacks elite quickness and struggles with his pad level given his immense size. There is a lot to work with, but those limitations likely will keep him on the right side of the line for his career. Still, I think he can be a quality starter if he keeps his weight under control and works on his pass protection.

50. Alec Pierce, WR, Cincinnati
Opinions seem to be split on Pierce. On one hand, he has an enticing blend of size and long speed. He posted elite numbers in the vertical and broad jump. He was a big-play threat all year long at Cincinnati. On the other, can he really be more than just a big-play option? His film shows the ability to get open if he does not have elite quickness. Some of it can be blamed on a quarterback who seemingly struggled on intermediate routes over the middle. There is enough there that I think you can take a second-round flier on him and see if he can develop into a mid-tier No. 1 option.

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2022 NFL Draft Big Board: Top 25 dominated by offensive and defensive linemen

It is hard to believe it is already November. The first round of College Football Playoff rankings have already dropped and the second edition will already see a new top 4 following Michigan State’s loss to Purdue. While I have thoroughly enjoyed this wild college football season, I am also looking ahead to the 2022 NFL draft. This class is one of the most interesting ones we have had in recent years. Without an elite quarterback prospect, this group is dominated by elite offensive and defensive linemen. For the countless general managers who love to build in the trenches, this class is going to be a really fun one.

I already dropped my first mock draft of the year last week, but now I turn my attention to my first big board of the 2022 draft cycle. Mock drafts focus more on team fits, positional value and need. Big boards solely look at who the best prospects are to compete at the next level. While yes, it is likely that a quarterback goes in the top five picks, I do not have any ranked among my top 15 prospects. It is also unusual to see teams taking a safety in the top five, and just because Kyle Hamilton is a top-five player, it does not mean I think he will be a top-five draft pick.

This group has already been a fun one to break down and I have tons more film to go through before we reach draft day. I’ve watched at least two games for just about all of the prospects I have ranked below. This is far from set in stone. It is merely my initial assessment of where these prospects stack up. Without further ado, let’s get to these future NFL stars.

1. Kayvon Thibodeaux, EDGE, Oregon
There really isn’t anything Kayvon Thibodeaux can’t do. He is dominant as a pass rusher and disruptive against the run. He brings all of the projectables you want to see from a top-end edge rusher. With his length, bend and burst off the edge, he can line up with hand in the dirt or as a standup pass rusher. His ability to change the game makes him the top prospect in this class.

2. Evan Neal, OT, Alabama
Size, speed and power. Evan Neal has it all. At 6’7”, 360 lbs, he is a mountain of a man, but moves like someone at least 100 pounds lighter than him. He has experience on both sides of the line, but has shown he is more than capable of holding his own in pass protection this year in the SEC. He has all the tools to be a franchise left tackle. He flashes some moments on film where he just flat out dominates opposing linemen. He did it to DeMarvin Leal earlier this season. I think he will be one of the top five players off the board come April.

3. Kyle Hamilton, S, Notre Dame
Independent of position, Kyle Hamilton is one of the best players in this draft. Obviously, we don’t see too many safeties that go in the top three, but Hamilton could genuinely be worth the selection. Unlike Jamal Adams, he has the coverage ability to make him worth the selection this early in the draft. However, he is still a hard hitter who wraps up well and can play just about anywhere you want in coverage. His range makes him a complete player.

4. Aidan Hutchinson, EDGE, Michigan
If it is possible, breaking his leg in 2020 was likely a great thing for Aidan Hutchinson. He was in the mix to go in the top 50 last season. Now, it will be a surprise to see Hutchinson fall out of the top 10. He is a problem for opposing offensive lines in pass protection. He has six sacks this season and the length needed to succeed in the NFL. I expect him to test pretty well at the combine and at his pro day as well to bolster his draft stock.

5. Derek Stingley Jr., CB, LSU
Injuries have started to hurt Derek Stingley Jr.’s draft stock. When he has played this year, he has not looked like the elite shutdown corner we saw in 2019 and much of 2020. He has the physical tools and tape to be a top-five pick. However, he is going to need to answer a lot of questions in the pre-draft process. Otherwise, we could see Stingley start sliding much further down draft boards.

6. Kenyon Green, OL, Texas A&M
Pick a position on the offensive line, Kenyon Green has most likely played it. He has taken snaps at every spot except center this year. Many see him fitting best as a guard at the next level, but he has been Texas A&M’s starting left tackle for much of this season. He has not done much to indicate he cannot play tackle in the NFL, but measurements and testing numbers might dictate how teams view him.

7. George Karlaftis, EDGE, Purdue
Purdue has been a giant killer this season. George Karlaftis is a big part of the reason the Boilermakers are making noise on the national stage. He has not put up the huge pass rushing numbers so far this season, but his impact can be seen on tape. He is very capable of turning the corner and chasing down opposing running backs and quarterbacks. He is a quick-twitch athlete with plenty of upside that should land him in the top 10.

8. DeMarvin Leal, DL, Texas A&M
Something of a tweener, DeMarvin Leal has plenty of experience at end and at tackle from his time at Texas A&M. I like him best on the interior. That’s not to say he cannot play out on the edge, but I think he projects best as a defensive tackle. His ability to beat interior offensive line off the snap with his quickness is incredibly impactful. He has the strength to fight through run blocks as well. Teams needing a 1-technique or 3-technique player should be all over Leal.

9. Devin Lloyd, LB, Utah
One of my favorite players in this draft class, I’ve been banging the drum for Devin Lloyd since 2019. He jumped out to me on film when watching Bradlee Anae. His athleticism and nose for the football stood out. He can do a little bit of everything, evidenced by his 81 tackles, 6 sacks and 3 interceptions in 2021. Sometimes, he is guilty of being over aggressive and not reading his keys, but he is usually an instinctive, downhill player with good production.

10. Tyler Linderbaum, C, Iowa
Given his size, Tyler Linderbaum won’t be for everyone. He is listed at 6’3”, 290 lbs, which is definitely a little light for interior linemen in the NFL. However, he is one of the most agile linemen in the country and has some nastiness to his blocking. For any team that runs a zone blocking scheme or one that emphasizes pulling linemen to block, he would be an excellent fit. Despite that slightly smaller frame, he is still more than capable of blowing opposing defensive linemen off the ball and putting them on the ground.

11. Ahmad Gardner, CB, Cincinnati
The man known as Sauce is certainly no secret. He is arguably the best player on Cincinnati. Desmond Ridder and Myjai Sanders might have something to say about that. One thing is for sure, he is definitely the best NFL prospect on this team. A big corner, Ahmad Gardner is a press man corner with experience in zone schemes. I think he has the size and traits to be a true No. 1 corner at the next level.

12. Drake London, WR, USC
Despite a broken ankle, Drake London is my No. 1 wide receiver right now. He reminds me a lot of Mike Evans in his play style. Given his size and ability to catch the ball away from his body, he is a mismatch for most opposing corners. His production this season certainly points to that. He eclipsed 1,000 yards in just eight games. USC threw at him a lot too, as he recorded at least nine catches in all but one game this year. He certainly has room to improve his route running, but I like what he brings to the table.

13. Jordan Davis, DL, Georgia
After watching Jordan Davis, it is fair to wonder how people that large are able to move that fast. Davis is 6’6”, 340 lbs, but he has burst off the line of scrimmage. He can collapse the pocket and stuff the run. On tape, he displays good play strength and a solid understanding of gap assignments. It is fair to wonder how much he benefits from playing with the talent around him. That being said, there is no way Georgia linebackers would look as good without him eating up blocks in front of them.

14. Garrett Wilson, WR, Ohio State
Garrett Wilson’s production won’t blow you away. It is solid, with 687 yards and 6 touchdowns on 43 catches, but far from breaking any records. However, his tape tells a different story. He has the stop-and-start ability to make defenders miss, reliable hands and a well-developed route tree. He is an all-around receiver who can fit some different roles as needed. 

15. Drake Jackson, EDGE, USC
When you look at Drake Jackson’s athletic profile, it is easy to see how he fits at the NFL level. He is built like a prototypical 3-4 outside linebacker, standing 6’4″, 255 lbs. While primarily serving as a pass rusher, Jackson does have a couple of snaps where he drops into coverage, mostly in the flats. It definitely his not is strong suit, but it is good to see him show he is capable of being a three-down player. Why teams will be interested though is because of his quick first step and tantalizing length. He understands the importance of keeping contain, but still has room to grow as a block shedder. He is an intriguing prospect.

16. Ikem Ekwonu, OT, North Carolina State
The Athletic called him the most feared offensive linemen in the ACC. Put on the film and it is easy to see why. Ikem Ekwonu blocks to the whistle on just about every play, many of which involve him putting defenders on the ground. He shows some incredible raw power as a run blocker and is fairly polished in pass protection. There is room for improvement when it comes to his balance and footwork, but that mostly points to a higher ceiling for him to reach given all his physical gifts.

17. Sean Rhyan, OT, UCLA
There are a few things I really like about Sean Rhyan’s game. He always keeps the play in front of him. He slides his feet well and keeps his head up to see what he is hitting. I can’t tell you how many offensive linemen I watch that drop their heads as they lean into a block. You won’t see that very often with Rhyan. He has decent athleticism for the position but it won’t blow you away. If he can take the next step as a run blocker, he could push himself even higher up my board.

18. Matt Corral, QB, Ole Miss
This is not the year to desperately need a quarterback. That’s not to say Matt Corral won’t succeed in the NFL. His play style and traits are reminiscent of Baker Mayfield, maybe without the same arm strength. Corral does show nice zip on his passes, but his ball placement is inconsistent. He has a good internal clock, but there are moments where he hangs onto the ball too long. He has enough athleticism to hang in the modern NFL, but he won’t be putting up huge rushing numbers. There is definitely a bit of room for improvement if he can improve his accuracy.

19. Christian Harris, LB, Alabama
The latest example of the modern day NFL linebacker, Christian Harris is built like a linebacker, but moves like a safety. He has great closing speed and flashes impressive strength as a pass rusher against backs and tight ends. He is a very effective blitzer and has more than enough range to play in coverage. So far, he has not shown the awareness or ability to work through run blocks to be a middle linebacker, but he could fit really well as an outside backer in a 4-3 scheme.

20. Andrew Booth, CB, Clemson
I tend to be a fan of taller corners. If you take a look at the top outside corners around the NFL, most are at least 5’11”. Jaire Alexander is pretty much the only elite corner below that threshold, and he is 5’10”. All of that to say that Andrew Booth Jr. checks all the physical boxes for a top outside corner. He has plus athleticism and good ball skills as well. This is more of a projection as to where he could end up, but there is a lot to like so far.

21. Charles Cross, OT, Mississippi State
This offensive line class is shaping up to be a pretty good one. Charles Cross has all the physical tools to be a really good right tackle and the potential to start as a blindside protector down the line. He is physical in the ground game, even if Mississippi State’s offense does not run the ball much. Cross’ 2021 film shows some improved hand placement and technique in pass protection, but I am concerned by how consistently he is beaten across his face, a cardinal sin in pass blocking. If he can fix the problem, likely oversetting in pass blocking kick, he will move up on my board.

22. Kaiir Elam, CB, Florida
Another long, tall corner, Kaiir Elam has all the traits to be a good press-man corner. He is 6’2” with good open field speed and shows physicality on film. I haven’t been able to watch too much of his 2021 film yet, but his 2020 film shows some room for improvement in zone and off coverage. He is definitely better when he is allowed to keep contact with opposing receivers. I’m excited to dig into more of his tape from this year.

23. Malik Willis, QB, Liberty
Much like Trey Lance and Jordan Love as prospects before him, Malik Willis has exciting physical traits and some truly spectacular plays on film, but struggles with consistency and has a lot of developing to do before he is ready to be a starting NFL quarterback. The arm talent is clearly there, but he holds onto the ball way too long and has not learned to throw it away. Following a hot start, he has come back down to earth. He now has three games this season with three interceptions. He also took a staggering nine sacks against Ole Miss. Some of that is on his offensive line, but Willis needs to identify the rush and learn to get rid of the football when he knows the pressure is coming.

24. Jameson Williams, WR, Alabama
Another year, another incredibly talented Alabama wide receiver. Jameson Williams is not quite as polished or physically dominant as Jerry Jeudy, Henry Ruggs, Jaylen Waddle or DeVonta Smith, but he is a solid route runner with good hands and a knack for the big play. He has surpassed John Metchie as the top receiver in Alabama’s offense. I will be really interested to see how he tests during the pre draft process. 

25. Daxton Hill, S, Michigan
Much of the early scouting process is focused on identifying traits in players that can translate to the NFL. It does not take long to start seeing how Daxton Hill’s traits could translate. He posted the highest SPARQ rating in the 2019 recruiting class and you can see his clear speed and burst when you watch him fly around in Michigan’s defense. He also has reps in man-to-man coverage out of the slot. With experience at both safety spots, he could be a versatile chess piece for defensive coordinators to move around at the next level. 

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Final Top 100 Big Board and positional rankings for the 2021 NFL draft

The countdown has reached one. On the final day before the NFL draft, I decided to have some fun with my player rankings. I am going to dive into my top 100, my positional rankings and even rank the position groups in this class.

This was easily the most difficult year I’ve ever had trying to nail down my final rankings. With no combine, incomplete medical information and the pandemic truly testing my mental fortitude, I certainly struggled. However, as I sit here in late April, I still feel pretty good about the list I have put together. I will dive into more of the specifics for some of these rankings when I get into the positional rankings. I also noted the cut off for where I have players graded by round. Without further ado, here are my top 100 players in this draft.

  1. Trevor Lawrence, QB, Clemson
  2. Ja’Marr Chase, WR, LSU
  3. Penei Sewell, OT, Oregon
  4. Trey Lance, QB, North Dakota State
  5. Jaylen Waddle, WR, Alabama
  6. Kyle Pitts, TE, Florida
  7. Zach Wilson, QB, BYU
  8. DeVonta Smith, WR, Alabama
  9. Micah Parsons, LB, Penn State
  10. Patrick Surtain II, CB, Alabama
  11. Rashawn Slater, OT, Northwestern
  12. Christian Darrisaw, OT, Virginia Tech
  13. Justin Fields, QB, Ohio State
  14. Alijah Vera-Tucker, G, USC
  15. Najee Harris, RB, Alabama
  16. Jeremiah Owusu-Koramoah, LB/S, Notre Dame
  17. Jaycee Horn, CB, South Carolina
  18. Mac Jones, QB, Alabama
  19. Greg Newsome, CB, Northwestern
  20. Travis Etienne, RB, Clemson
  21. Caleb Farley, CB, Virginia Tech
  22. Gregory Rousseau, EDGE, Miami
  23. Rashod Bateman, WR, Minnesota
  24. Christian Barmore, DL, Alabama
  25. Kwity Paye, EDGE, Michigan
  26. Kadarius Toney, WR, Florida
  27. Trevon Moehrig, S, TCU
  28. Zaven Collins, LB, Tulsa (First-round cut off)
  29. Samuel Cosmi, OT, Texas
  30. Creed Humphrey, C, Oklahoma
  31. Pat Freiermuth, TE, Penn State
  32. Wyatt Davis, G, Ohio State
  33. Liam Eichenburg, OT, Notre Dame
  34. Jaelan Phillips, EDGE, Miami
  35. Carlos Basham, DL, Wake Forest
  36. Jabril Cox, LB, LSU
  37. Joe Tryon, EDGE, Washington
  38. Jalen Mayfield, OT, Michigan
  39. Jamin Davis, LB, Kentucky
  40. Jayson Oweh, EDGE, Penn State
  41. Eric Stokes, CB, Georgia
  42. Terrace Marshall, WR, LSU
  43. Javonte Williams, RB, UNC
  44. Azeez Ojulari, EDGE, Georgia
  45. Daviyon Nixon, DL, Iowa
  46. Tyson Campbell, CB, Georgia
  47. Joseph Ossai, EDGE, Texas
  48. Brevin Jordan, TE, Miami
  49. Nico Collins, WR, Michigan
  50. Dillon Radunz, OT, North Dakota State
  51. Jevon Holland, S, Oregon
  52. Paulson Adebo, CB, Stanford
  53. Quincy Roche, EDGE, Miami
  54. Rashad Weaver, EDGE, Pittsburgh
  55. Teven Jenkins, OT, Oklahoma State
  56. Patrick Jones II, EDGE, Pittsburgh
  57. Andre Cisco, S, Syracuse
  58. Ifeatu Melifonwu, CB, Syracuse
  59. Alex Leatherwood, OT, Alabama
  60. Kelvin Joseph, CB, Kentucky
  61. Baron Browning, LB, Ohio State
  62. Landon Dickerson, C, Alabama
  63. Jay Tufele, DL, USC
  64. Elijah Moore, WR, Ole Miss
  65. Peter Werner, LB, Ohio State
  66. James Hudson III, OT, Cincinnati (Second-round cut off)
  67. Rondale Moore, WR, Purdue
  68. Nick Bolton, LB, Missouri
  69. Chazz Surratt, LB, UNC
  70. Amari Rodgers, WR, Clemson
  71. Richie Grant, S, UCF
  72. Trey Smith, G, Tennessee
  73. Ronnie Perkins, EDGE, Oklahoma
  74. Asante Samuel Jr., CB, Florida State
  75. Levi Onwuzurike, DL, Washington
  76. Davis Mills, QB, Stanford
  77. Benjamin St-Juste, CB, Minnesota
  78. Walker Little, OT, Stanford
  79. Shi Smith, WR, South Carolina
  80. Spencer Brown, OT, Northern Iowa
  81. Michael Carter, RB, UNC
  82. Aaron Robinson, CB, UCF
  83. Tylan Wallace, WR, Oklahoma State
  84. Dylan Moses, LB, Alabama
  85. Kyle Trask, QB, Florida
  86. Marvin Wilson, DL, Florida State
  87. Amon-Ra St. Brown, WR, USC
  88. D’Wayne Eskridge, WR, Western Michigan
  89. Dyami Brown, WR, UNC
  90. Payton Turner, EDGE, Houston
  91. Tommy Tremble, Notre Dame (Third-round cut off)
  92. Tyler Shelvin, DL, LSU
  93. Nolan Laufenburg, G, Air Force
  94. Robert Rochell, CB, Central Arkansas
  95. Monty Rice, LB, Georgia
  96. Quinn Meinerz, C, Wisconsin-Whitewater
  97. Cameron McGrone, LB, Michigan
  98. Jackson Carmen, G, Clemson
  99. Shaun Wade, CB, Ohio State
  100. Kenny Yeboah, TE, Ole Miss

Let’s get into the nitty gritty now and take a look at each of the position groups. I tried to get very granular with these. Too often we just use the terms “EDGE” or “Linebacker” for so many front seven players. I wanted to really dive into which players fit into which schemes in my eyes.

Quarterback

  1. Trevor Lawrence, Clemson
  2. Trey Lance, North Dakota State
  3. Zach Wilson, BYU
  4. Mac Jones, Alabama
  5. Justin Fields, Ohio State
  6. Davis Mills, Stanford
  7. Kyle Trask, Florida
  8. Kellen Mond, Texas A&M
  9. Jamie Newman, QB, Wake Forest
  10. Shane Buechele, SMU

I don’t think there should be any surprise at No. 1. Trevor Lawrence checks all the physical boxes and enters the NFL with a wealth of high-level college experience. Meanwhile, my No. 2 quarterback lacks a lot of that polish that teams love about Lawrence. Trey Lance is incredibly physically gifted and has an incredibly high ceiling. I like his size a lot and think he is more likely to hold up at the next level than Zach Wilson. I do believe that Wilson has the best arm in this draft class, but I worry that he will not last long in the NFL. He runs with abandon and we saw that lead to a few injuries in college. Mac Jones is the most pro-ready passer in this class, but lacks the physical traits that wow fans and scouts alike. His ball placement is special though and I think he will be successful in the NFL, even if he is a bit unathletic by today’s standards for the position. Justin Fields is more of a project than I think most people realize. His speed is incredible, but his throwing motion and technique lack refining. I still believe in his potential, but I think his floor is lower than anyone else in the top five. Davis Mills is the biggest question mark in this class. Between injuries and a lack of experience, this is all about projection for him. I think he is a third-round prospect who will come off the board much sooner. Kellen Mond and Kyle Trask have some encouraging traits, but don’t bring enough to the table to make me believe either one of them will be high-end starters. I think both could be successful, but it will be more because of their surrounding talent than their raw skill. Jamie Newman is a wild card. He transferred from Wake Forest to Georgia only to opt out of the 2020 season after losing the starting job to Stetson Bennett. He is an intriguing project, but needs a ton of work. Shane Buchele is one of my favorite late-round quarterbacks. I think he could develop into a low-end starter or a reliable backup at the next level.

Running Back

  1. Najee Harris, Alabama
  2. Travis Etienne, Clemson
  3. Javonte Williams, UNC
  4. Michael Carter, UNC
  5. Rhammondre Stevenson, Oklahoma
  6. Trey Sermon, Ohio State
  7. Khalil Herbert, Virginia Tech
  8. Kenny Gainwell, Memphis
  9. Chuba Hubbard, Oklahoma State
  10. Kylin Hill, Mississippi State

The top six running backs in this class feel like they could be regular starters in the NFL. Najee Harris is an exciting blend of size and skill. He is a big back with good vision and incredible hands. He will be an asset in the pass game, which is rare for a player his size. Travis Etienne is a home run hitter with reliable hands out of the backfield. He has impressive burst and balance with the ability to turn the corner on just about any play. Javonte Williams runs how you would expect a former linebacker to. He seeks out contact, pushes through arm tackles and keeps his legs churning through the hit. His backfield mate Michael Carter was the lightning to Williams’ thunder. He is elusive and agile with good hands as a receiver. He carries his weight well and seems sturdy enough to survive in the NFL despite being a bit undersized. Rhammondre Stevenson reminds me a lot of LeGarrette Blount. He will probably only be a two-down back in the NFL, but he is a slasher who can pick up good yardage whenever he touches the ball. I believe Trey Sermon’s draft stock would have been much higher if he did not miss the national championship game. He runs with purpose and showed flashes of being an elite back. Those flashes were just a bit too inconsistent to rank him higher. Khalil Herbert wraps up his college career with a fair amount of tread on his tires. He is far from Jonathan Taylor levels, but it is still a concern for me. He was an exciting player to watch in his one year at Virginia Tech and would be a solid addition to just about any backfield in the league. On the opposite end of the spectrum, we haven’t seen Kenny Gainwell take the field since his incredible 2019 season. He has low usage, but can he replicate his success, or will he be a one-season wonder? Chuba Hubbard is closer to the Hebert end of this spectrum. He had an outrageous 351 touches in 2019 before scaling things back in a shorter 2020 season. He definitely waited a year too long to leave school, but if he recreate his 2019 form, he will be a mid-round steal. Kylin Hill feels like a quality No. 2 back, ready to handle 8-to-12 touches per game right away.

Wide Receiver

  1. Ja’Marr Chase, LSU
  2. Jaylen Waddle, Alabama
  3. DeVonta Smith, Alabama
  4. Rashod Bateman, Minnesota
  5. Kadarius Toney, Florida
  6. Terrace Marshall, LSU
  7. Nico Collins, Michigan
  8. Elijah Moore, Ole Miss
  9. Rondale Moore, Purdue
  10. Amari Rodgers, Clemson
  11. Shi Smith, South Carolina
  12. Tylan Wallace, Oklahoma State
  13. Amon-Ra St. Brown, USC
  14. D’Wyane Eskridge, Western Michigan
  15. Dyami Brown, UNC
  16. Sage Surratt, Wake Forest
  17. Anthony Schwartz, Auburn
  18. Demetric Felton, UCLA
  19. Tomorrion Terry, Florida State
  20. Josh Imatorbhebhe, Illinois

This is another loaded receiver class. The top three are about as good as they come. Ja’Marr Chase might just be the best receiver prospect since Julio Jones. Jaylen Waddle might have been on his way to the Heisman before breaking his ankle. The actual Heisman winner, DeVonta Smith, is a technician with great hands and an impressive catch radius. Rashod Bateman could be a really strong possession receiver in the NFL. Few players are as fun to watch as Kadarius Toney, but he needs a bit more consistency in his play. Terrace Marshall was the third option in LSU’s historic 2019 passing offense, but he still won his matchups and looked sharp as the top guy in 2020. Nico Collins is a big-body receiver with great ability to adjust to the ball in the air. He still has some refining to do, but Michigan receivers have excelled after getting out of Ann Arbor in recent years. If you are looking for a slot machine, Elijah Moore is your best bet in this year’s class. Rondale Moore has first-round level talent, but undrafted levels of experience and injury history. In a year where the medicals are tough to confirm, he could definitely slide. He was rarely the star of the show, but Amari Rodgers deserves a bit more credit for Clemson’s offensive success. Shi Smith is one of my favorite sleepers in this draft. Tylan Wallace seemed like he should not be able to get open as frequently as he did in college. His good technique helps him overcome his lack of elite athleticism. Amon-Ra St. Brown strikes me as a future No. 2 in the right offense with his strength and leaping ability. Small-school star D’Wayne Eskridge could be the latest MAC receiver to take the NFL by storm. Dyami Brown can win downfield, but struggled with drops in his career. His game feels like a great fit for the Chargers offense. I had high expectations for Sage Surratt heading into 2020. He definitely didn’t meet them, capped off by an injury-riddled Senior Bowl week. When healthy, he is a nightmare for undersized corners. Someone is going to take a chance on Anthony Schwartz and his 4.27 speed. Demetric Felton showed out at the Senior Bowl and could be a fun player for offensive coordinators to move around. Tommorrion Terry instant brings value as a vertical threat. Much like Donovan Peoples-Jones, I think Josh Imatorbhebhe’s athleticism is going to translate very well to the NFL.

Tight End

  1. Kyle Pitts, Florida
  2. Pat Freiermuth, Penn State
  3. Brevin Jordan, Miami
  4. Tommy Tremble, Notre Dame
  5. Kenny Yeboah, Ole Miss
  6. Hunter Long, Boston College
  7. Tre’ McKitty, Georgia
  8. Quinton Morris, Bowling Green
  9. Noah Gray, Duke
  10. Kylen Granson, SMU

This tight end class is better than last year’s, but that’s not saying much. Kyle Pitts is truly a generational talent at the position. Pat Freiermuth is a borderline first round talent with his physical skill set. I like how Brevin Jordan’s game should translate to the NFL. He fits the mold of these athletic tight ends allowed to operate in space. He is definitely a bit of a throwback, but Tommy Tremble provides immediate value as a blocker. Kenny Yeboah showed impressive ball skills and athleticism at the Senior Bowl. Hunter Long could be a solid second option at the position. Same goes for Quinton Morris and Tre’ McKitty. If you are looking for a late-round flier at the position, Noah Gray and Kylen Granson are my picks.

Offensive Tackle

  1. Penei Sewell, Oregon
  2. Rashawn Slater, Northwestern
  3. Christian Darrisaw, Virginia Tech
  4. Samuel Cosmi, Texas
  5. Liam Eichenburg, Notre Dame
  6. Jalen Mayfield, Michigan
  7. Dillon Radunz, North Dakota State
  8. Teven Jenkins, Oklahoma State
  9. Alex Leatherwood, Alabama
  10. James Hudson III, Cincinnati
  11. Walker Little, Stanford
  12. Spencer Brown, Northern Iowa
  13. Brady Christiansen, BYU
  14. Stone Forsyth, Florida
  15. D’Ante Smith, East Carolina

Unlike the tight end class, the offensive line group brings both sizzle and substance. Penei Sewell is an outstanding athlete with plenty more room for growth in his game. Rashawn Slater could be a rock-solid tackle or an All-Pro guard. That versatility is enticing. Good luck moving Christian Darrisaw once he has anchored down. Getting Samuel Cosmi to an NFL squat rack could see him realize his immense potential. Liam Eichenburg is definitely one of my draft crushes. He just screams unheralded Pro Bowl right tackle for the next eight years to me. He has not developed quite as quickly as many hoped, but Jalen Mayfield still brings plenty to the table and could be a Day 1 starter at right tackle. While Trey Lance deserves the buzz, Dillon Radunz has the makings of a quality starting tackle who can kick inside to guard if the transition from I-AA ball proves to be too difficult. Teven Jenkins has all the necessary athleticism to be a great tackle, but his measurables worry me a little bit. It is unclear if Alex Leatherwood’s future is at tackle, but he has the versatility and experience to be a fit somewhere along the offensive line. James Hudson is still new to the position and would be a great project to work with. When healthy, Walker Little has looked like a first-round talent, but after seeing him play just one game across 2019 and 2020, it is hard to buy into his intangibles. His injury history and lack of experience scare me a bit. Spencer Brown is raw, but few human beings can move the way he does at 6’8″ and 300-plus pounds. Without a doubt, Brady Christiansen is a bit more polished than some of the guys ahead of him, but at 25-years-old, he is one of the oldest prospects in this class. In the later rounds, you look for traits to build upon. Stone Forsyth and D’Ante Smith both bring great size and length to the position.

Interior Offensive Lineman

  1. Alijah Vera-Tucker, USC
  2. Creed Humphrey, Oklahoma
  3. Wyatt Davis, Ohio State
  4. Landon Dickerson, Alabama
  5. Trey Smith, Tennessee
  6. Nolan Laufenburg, Air Force
  7. Quinn Meinerz, Wisconsin-Whitewater
  8. Jackson Carman, Clemson
  9. Drew Dalman, Stanford
  10. Aaron Banks, Notre Dame
  11. Ben Cleveland, Georgia
  12. Drake Jackson, Kentucky
  13. Jimmy Morrissey, Pittsburgh
  14. Deonte Brown, Alabama
  15. Robert Hainsey, Notre Dame

This is a deep group of starting caliber centers, but the best interior lineman in this draft is definitely Alijah Vera-Tucker. I love Creed Humphrey and the experience he brings after four seasons starting at Oklahoma. I think he is pro-ready with some more potential still to be unlocked. Wyatt Davis is a road grader who will improve any running game. Landon Dickerson’s injury history holds him back after yet another knee injury. He will be a solid starter if he can get back to his pre-injury form. Trey Smith tested very well at Tennessee’s pro day and should be a starter at either guard spot in the NFL. Nolan Laufenburg is not getting much press, but he is a beast as a run blocker and has solid lateral quickness for the position. His crop top drew a lot of attention at the Senior Bowl. Quinn Meinerz backed it up with some solid play and could be a starting center come 2022. Drew Dalman tested incredibly well and could be the latest Stanford lineman to find success at the next level. Similar to Stanford, Notre Dame has a good track record of sending offensive linemen to the pros and I think that trend will continue with Aaron Banks. Ben Cleveland might be a steal in the later rounds of the draft with his combination of size and agility. While a bit undersized, Drake Jackson played really well at the Senior Bowl. Jimmy Morrissey is one of my favorite late round interior linemen. Deonte Brown is massive, but his lack of athleticism showed up in Mobile. Robert Hainsey feels like he will last a long time in the NFL as a swing guard providing depth.

4-3 Defensive End

  1. Gregory Rousseau, Miami
  2. Kwity Paye, Michigan
  3. Jaelan Phillips, Miami
  4. Carlos Basham, Wake Forest
  5. Joe Tryon, Washington
  6. Jayson Oweh, Penn State
  7. Azeez Ojulari, Georgia
  8. Joseph Ossai, Texas
  9. Rashad Weaver, Pittsburgh
  10. Patrick Jones II, Pittsburgh
  11. Ronnie Perkins, Oklahoma
  12. Payton Turner, Houston
  13. Dayo Odeyingbo, Vanderbilt
  14. Hamilcar Rashed Jr., Oregon State
  15. Shaka Toney, Penn State

Time to really break things down. Gregory Rousseau is definitely raw and unrefined, but his tape makes me believe he can find success as a down lineman. Kwity Paye’s athleticism will likely see him drafted in the first round, but there is a lot of room for improvement. Without the injury concerns, Jaelan Phillips would be the top edge rusher in this class, but they are too big to ignore. Carlos Basham is quietly one of the best defensive linemen in this draft class. He got double-teamed a lot at Wake Forest. With his size and length, Joe Tyron can add or drop from his frame to fit what scheme he is drafted to play in. Jayson Oweh raw athleticism definitely points to him being more successful in the pros than he was in college. Azeez Ojulari only does one thing as a speed rusher, but he does it really well. Joseph Ossai is still learning how to play on the edge after starting his career as an off-ball linebacker. After missing 2019 with a torn ACL, Rashad Weaver impressed me in 2020. I’m willing to bet he looks even better another year removed from his injury. His teammate, Patrick Jones II, fell a bit in the draft process, but was incredibly productive and consistent throughout his college career. He missed part of the season due to a suspension, but Ronnie Perkins was nearly unstoppable down the stretch for Oklahoma. Both Payton Turner and Dayo Odeyingbo bring elite length to the position. Even if they are not the most refined prospects, those intangibles are worth targeting in the middle rounds. Hamilcar Rashed Jr. took a major step back production wise in 2020, leaving scouts to wonder if his 2019 breakout was actually an anomaly. While not quite as athletic as his former Penn State teammate, Shaka Toney is still an intriguing project.

3-4 Defensive End

  1. Gregory Rousseau, Miami
  2. Christian Barmore, Alabama
  3. Kwity Paye, Michigan
  4. Carlos Basham, Wake Forest
  5. Joe Tryon, Washington
  6. Daviyon Nixon, Iowa
  7. Rashad Weaver, Pittsburgh
  8. Jay Tufele, USC
  9. Levi Onwuzurike, Washington
  10. Marvin Wilson, Florida State
  11. Payton Turner, Houston
  12. Milton Williams, Louisiana Tech
  13. Dayo Odeyingbo, Vanderbilt
  14. Osa Odighizuwa, UCLA
  15. Alim McNeil, NC State

I won’t belabor the point with players I already talked about. Christian Barmore has tons of exciting traits, but rumors that he is resistant to coaching could cause him to slide. Daviyon Nixon has some incredible moments on film at Iowa. If he can find some consistency, he will be a star in the NFL. Jay Tufele lost a lot of his traction after opting out, but he projects as a future starter in the league. As the league trends towards finding interior pass rushing, Levi Onwuzurike fits the profile of a disruptive interior player. No player likely hurt their draft stock worse than Marvin Wilson. Still, I’m willing to bet on him rediscovering his 2019 form with a change of scenery. Milton Williams turned some heads with the testing numbers he posted. His athleticism will be something teams covet. Osa Odighizuwa is longer than he is tall, which bodes well for him at the next level. It seems like every year NC State produces another NFL defensive lineman. I expect Alim McNeil to do his part as a rotational player.

4-3 Defensive Tackle

  1. Gregory Rousseau, Miami
  2. Christian Barmore, Alabama
  3. Carlos Basham, Wake Forest
  4. Joe Tryon, Washington
  5. Daviyon Nixon, Iowa
  6. Jay Tufele, USC
  7. Levi Onwuzurike, Washington
  8. Marvin Wilson, Florida State
  9. Payton Turner, Houston
  10. Tyler Shelvin, LSU
  11. Milton Williams, Louisiana Tech
  12. Osa Odighizuwa, UCLA
  13. Alim McNeil, NC State
  14. Darius Stills, West Virginia
  15. Marlon Tuipulotu, USC

Believe it or not, I think this is Gregory Rousseau’s best fit in the NFL. At 6’7″, he has room to add to his frame. He dominated interior linemen while at Miami. If he can bulk up a bit, I think he could be an elite 3-tech. Tyler Shelvin enters the conversation here. He is definitely best suited as a nose tackle, but I think he could survive as a run-stuffer paired with an interior pass rusher in a 4-3 scheme. Darius Stills and Marlon Tuipulotu both bring a lot of experience, which could serve them well as potential backups in the league.

3-4 Defensive Tackle

  1. Christian Barmore, Alabama
  2. Daviyon Nixon, Iowa
  3. Jay Tufele, USC
  4. Marvin Wilson, Florida State
  5. Tyler Shelvin, LSU
  6. Alim McNeil, NC State
  7. Marlon Tuipulotu, USC
  8. Tommy Togiai, Ohio State
  9. Tedarrel Slaton, Florida
  10. Bobby Brown, Texas A&M

This is not a good draft to need a nose tackle. Tommy Togiai plays bigger than he really is, which is good because he is a bit undersized in this spot. Tedarrel Slaton and Bobby Brown are space eaters who can contribute as two-down players and goal line defenders at the next level.

3-4 Outside Linebacker

  1. Zaven Collins, Tulsa
  2. Jaelan Phillips, Miami
  3. Joe Tyron, Washington
  4. Jayson Oweh, Penn State
  5. Azeez Ojulari, Georgia
  6. Joseph Ossai, Texas
  7. Quincy Roche, Miami
  8. Patrick Jones II, Pittsburgh
  9. Baron Browning, Ohio State
  10. Ronnie Perkins, Oklahoma
  11. Payton Turner, Houston
  12. Hamilcar Rashed Jr., Oregon State
  13. Shaka Toney, Penn State
  14. Malcolm Koonce, Buffalo
  15. Chris Rumph II, Duke

While I believe he is best suited to play off the ball, Zaven Collins is a solid pass rusher with great size. For the record, this is where I think Ojulari, Ossai, Perkins and Rashed Jr. fit best. Quincy Roche had a great week in Mobile, but he lacks the size to play in a 4-3 scheme. He could be a great situational pass rusher right out of the gate. Much like Collins, I like Baron Browning as an off-ball linebacker, but he has the athleticism to play on the outside. Malcolm Koonce and Chris Rumph II are lean edge rushers who could contribute in a rotational role.

4-3 Outside Linebacker

  1. Micah Parsons, Penn State
  2. Jeremiah Owusu-Koramoah, Notre Dame
  3. Zaven Collins, Tulsa
  4. Jabril Cox, LSU
  5. Jamin Davis, Kentucky
  6. Azeez Ojulari, Georgia
  7. Joseph Ossai, Texas
  8. Baron Browning, Ohio State
  9. Pete Werner, Ohio State
  10. Nick Bolton, Missouri
  11. Chazz Surratt, UNC
  12. Dylan Moses, Alabama
  13. Monty Rice, Georgia
  14. Cameron McGrone, Michigan
  15. K.J. Britt, Auburn

I considered putting Micah Parsons in the 3-4 group as well, but I think he does his best work when he is allowed to attack downhill and react without having players put their hands on him at the snap. Jeremiah Owusu-Koramoah won’t last long on draft night because of his ability to cover players in space. I also have him listed as my top strong safety. That’s the type of ability we are talking about here. Jabril Cox is not quite as fast as JOK, but he can still flex out and match up tight ends and slot receivers on occasion. Jamin Davis tested off the charts and his potential is as one of the best all-around linebackers in the game. Pete Werner seems like the next great undersized linebacker to start racking up 150-plus tackles at the next level. While he has great straight-line speed, I worry Nick Bolton is going to struggle given his lack of agility. Chazz Surratt is still learning the position, which points to untapped potential. However, he is also already 24 years old. A year ago, Dylan Moses seemed like a lock to go in the first round, even coming off a torn ACL. Now, he will be lucky to go in the first three rounds after a rocky season in his return from injury. Cameron McGrone is a bit undersized, but has a nose for the football. Monty Rice and K.J. Britt would be solid cover linebackers capable of coming in on third downs.

Inside Linebacker

  1. Micah Parsons, Penn State
  2. Jeremiah Owusu-Koramoah, Notre Dame
  3. Zaven Collins, Tulsa
  4. Jabril Cox, LSU
  5. Jamin Davis, Kentucky
  6. Baron Browning, Ohio State
  7. Pete Werner, Ohio State
  8. Nick Bolton, Missouri
  9. Chazz Surratt, UNC
  10. Dylan Moses, Alabama
  11. Monty Rice, Georgia
  12. Cameron McGrone, Michigan
  13. K.J. Britt, Auburn
  14. Riley Cole, South Alabama
  15. Charles Snowden, Virginia

Much of this list is the same, but we lose a few of the more natural pass rushers here. Riley Cole got his name on the radar at the Senior Bowl coming off a strong redshirt-senior season. Look for him in the later rounds. Same goes for Charles Snowden, whose size for the position will grab the attention of teams right away.

Cornerback

  1. Patrick Surtain II, Alabama
  2. Jaycee Horn, South Carolina
  3. Greg Newsome, Northwestern
  4. Caleb Farley, Virginia Tech
  5. Eric Stokes, Georgia
  6. Tyson Campbell, Georgia
  7. Paulson Adebo, Stanford
  8. Ifeatu Melifonwu, Syracuse
  9. Kelvin Joseph, Kentucky
  10. Asante Samuel Jr., Florida State
  11. Benjamin St-Juste, Minnesota
  12. Aaron Robinson, UCF
  13. Robert Rochell, Central Arkansas
  14. Shaun Wade, Ohio State
  15. Israel Mukuamu, South Carolina
  16. Elijah Molden, Washington
  17. Marco Wilson, Florida
  18. Tay Gowan, UCF
  19. Keith Taylor Jr., Washington
  20. Shakur Brown, Michigan State

This is a solid corner class that starts to drop off around the 13 or 14 mark. Patrick Surtain II could fit into any defensive scheme. His size and top end speed make him my top corner. Jaycee Horn and Greg Newsome move ahead of Caleb Farley as reports of his back issues seem to keep getting worse. Eric Stokes ran a 4.31 40-yard at his pro day, which ranks in the 97th percentile. Finding that type of speed in a 6’0″ corner is rare. His former Georgia teammate, Tyson Campbell, also ran well and is a bit taller, but he lacks the same fluidity as Stokes. Paulson Adebo fell off the radar after missing the end of 2019 with an injury and opting out of 2020. He tested great and his film makes me believe he could be a starter early in his career. If you are looking for long, toolsy corners, Ifeatu Melifonwu, Kelvin Joseph and Benjamin St-Juste deserve your attention. Asante Samuel Jr.’s tape is better than being the 10th corner in this draft, but his lack of size and length caps his upside. He would be a great nickel corner though. Aaron Robinson showed he has the physicality to be a good press corner at the Senior Bowl. Robert Rochell is a bit untested coming out of Central Arkansas, but his length and speed make him an interesting project. Shaun Wade and Israel Mukuamu are both long and physical, but have struggled in man coverage in their career on the outside. Those traits could be very useful in the right scheme though or at safety, if teams want them to switch positions. Elijah Molden and Marco Wilson could both be solid nickel corners. Tay Gowan is a bit of an unknown with only 13 career appearances, but could be worthy of a late flier. I came away very impressed by Keith Taylor Jr. at the Senior Bowl. He did not win every rep, but he was not afraid to compete with the top receivers in attendance. Shakur Brown has a nose for the football and could carve out a role for himself in the slot.

Strong Safety

  1. Jeremiah Owusu-Koramoah, Notre Dame
  2. Trevon Moehrig, TCU
  3. Jevon Holland, Oregon
  4. Richie Grant, UCF
  5. Divine Deablo, Virginia Tech
  6. Hamsah Nasirildeen, Florida State
  7. Talanoa Hufanga, USC
  8. Tyree Gillespie, Missouri
  9. Caden Sterns, Texas
  10. Shawn Davis, Florida

I already talked about it, but it’s worth repeating. Owusu-Koramoah is a true hybrid player. However, the best all-around safety in this draft is Trevon Moehrig. Jevon Holland brings tons of versatility. He can play in either safety spot and even line up in the slot. Richie Grant had an impressive career at UCF and backed that up with a strong week at the Senior Bowl. Don’t sleep on Divine Deablo. In addition to having a great name, he can be a heat-seeking missile. Hamsah Nasirildeen is a bit of a conundrum. I’m still not sure if he is a big safety or an undersized linebacker. While he lacks elite speed, Talanoa Hufanga is a playmaker and a leader. Tyree Gillespie has good long speed, but his lack of short-area quickness limits his upside. Shawn Davis and Caden Sterns are both long, hard-hitting safeties. Sterns has a bit more speed those, which gives him the edge.

Free Safety

  1. Trevon Moehrig, TCU
  2. Jevon Holland, Oregon
  3. Andre Cisco, Syracuse
  4. Ifeatu Melifonwu, Syracuse
  5. Richie Grant, UCF
  6. Jamar Johnson, Indiana
  7. Shaun Wade, Ohio State
  8. Israel Mukuamu, South Carolina
  9. Christian Uphoff, Illinois State
  10. Ar’Darius Washington, TCU

I’ve already praised Moehrig and Holland. I also love Andre Cisco. He was a ballhawk at Syracuse, but needs to improve as a tackler to really be a quality starter. Melifonwu has the size and range to be a potential centerfielder. Jamar Johnson sees the field well, but he does not bring any elite traits to the table. Christian Uphoff could be the latest D-III star to make the NFL jump. He lacks elite top speed, but his size and first step could see him hang around in the NFL. Ar’Darius Washington on the other hand is very undersized, but makes up for that with consistent effort and impressive initial quickness.

Ranking the position groups

  1. Wide Receiver – Top-end talent is among the best we’ve ever seen. There are plenty of good receivers that will slide into the later rounds.
  2. Offensive Tackle – With a few elite prospects and a good amount of depth, this offensive tackle class should produce a good number of starters.
  3. Quarterback – While extremely top heavy, this might be one of the best groups we’ve seen come out in a long time. All five quarterbacks could legitimately go in the top 10 picks. There just isn’t much depth in this year’s class.
  4. Cornerback – Without a standout prospect, this group is a bit more about volume. I have a ton of corners with second-round grades. I think we will see a decent group of starting corners come out of this class, even if they aren’t stars.
  5. Linebacker – There are a handful of really good players that could come off the board in the first three rounds. The quality of this group fades quickly after you make it through the first 11 or 12 players though.
  6. Running Back – There is no Saquon Barkley or Ezekiel Elliott in this class. Nor is there a ton of late-round backs that I feel confident in. I do have three running backs in my top 50, but only four in my top 100.
  7. Safety – Perhaps I am underrating this group a little. There are a number of fun and interesting safeties as you move down the board. There just aren’t many that you feel like are slam dunks.
  8. Interior Offensive Line – No Quenton Nelsons or Zach Martins to be found in this class. If you add Rashawn Slater to the mix, that does tip the scales a bit, but I think teams view him as a tackle.
  9. Edge Rushers – No elite prospects and not a ton of depth. This is a tough year to need a pass rusher. When only two players earn first-round grades, which is what I have, it’s an underwhelming class.
  10. Interior Defensive Line – Somehow, this group is even worse. It was difficult to come up with 10 potential nose tackles from this draft. Several of those players are better suited playing elsewhere. Overall, this interior line class stinks.

Final 2020 NFL Draft Big Board: Top 150 and Position Rankings

Draft day is practically here. I have thrown myself into draft prep in the midst of the coronavirus shutdown. This is a really amazing draft class to dive into as well. It might be the greatest receiver class in recent memory. There are some special playmakers on defense and a good crop of offensive tackles. It isn’t a bad year to need a quarterback either.

I will definitely have some surprises compared to the consensus here, but that’s what makes big boards worth reading. I know I am a bit higher on Michael Pittman, Bradlee Anae and Tyler Biadasz, whereas I am definitely a lot lower on K.J. Hamler, Raekwon Davis and CJ Henderson. With my final mock draft dropping tomorrow, I am just about ready to sit back and just watch the draft unfold! Here are my top 150 prospects for Thursday’s draft. I have noted along the way where I stopped giving out grades for each round. I am well aware that I have fewer first-round prospects than there are first round picks, but I also have way more second and third-round grades than there are picks.

  1. Chase Young, EDGE, Ohio State
  2. Jeff Okudah, CB, Ohio State
  3. Isaiah Simmons, LB/S, Clemson
  4. Jerry Jeudy, WR, Alabama
  5. Joe Burrow, QB, LSU
  6. Javon Kinlaw, DL, South Carolina
  7. Tristan Wirfs, OT, Iowa
  8. Tua Tagovailoa, QB, Alabama
  9. CeeDee Lamb, WR, Oklahoma
  10. Henry Ruggs, WR, Alabama
  11. Andrew Thomas, OT, Georgia
  12. Jedrick Wills, OT, Alabama
  13. Justin Jefferson, WR, LSU
  14. Derrick Brown, DL, Auburn
  15. Mekhi Becton, OT, Louisville
  16. Justin Herbert, QB, Oregon
  17. Xavier McKinney, S, Alabama
  18. Tee Higgins, WR, Clemson
  19. K’Lavon Chaisson, EDGE, LSU
  20. J.K. Dobbins, RB, Ohio State
  21. Josh Jones, OT, Houston
  22. Patrick Queen, LB, LSU
  23. A.J. Epenesa, DL, Iowa
  24. Bryce Hall, CB, Virginia
  25. Kenneth Murray, LB, Oklahoma
  26. Yetur Gross-Matos, EDGE, Penn State
  27. CJ Henderson, CB, Florida
  28. D’Andre Swift, RB, Georgia
  29. Zach Baun, LB, Wisconsin (End of round 1 grades)
    This cut off feels right for me. After this point, I start to feel a bit less confident in any number of things that makes me feel like taking this player in the first round is not worth the pick. If I am on the clock at pick 30 and all 29 of these players are gone. I am looking to move down.
  30. Ross Blacklock, DL, TCU
  31. Grant Delpit, S, LSU
  32. Jeff Gladney, CB, TCU
  33. Michael Pittman Jr., WR, USC
  34. Cesar Ruiz, C, Michigan
  35. Trevon Diggs, CB, Alabama
  36. Austin Jackson, OT, USC
  37. Clyde Edwards-Helaire, RB, LSU
  38. Neville Gallimore, DL, Oklahoma
  39. Jordan Love, QB, Utah State
  40. Noah Igbinoghene, CB, Auburn
  41. Denzel Mims, WR, Baylor
  42. Matt Hennessy, OL, Temple
  43. Kristian Fulton, CB, LSU
  44. Brandon Aiyuk, WR, Arizona State
  45. Antoine Winfield Jr., S, Minnesota
  46. Lucas Niang, OT, TCU
  47. Lloyd Cushenberry, OL, LSU
  48. Laviska Shenault, WR, Colorado
  49. Kyle Dugger, S, Lenoir Rhyne
  50. Jaylon Johnson, CB, Utah
  51. Josh Uche, EDGE, Michigan
  52. Tyler Biadasz, C, Wisconsin
  53. Chase Claypool, WR, Notre Dame
  54. Jeremy Chinn, S, Southern Illinois
  55. Curtis Weaver, EDGE, Boise State
  56. John Simpson, G, Clemson
  57. Cole Kmet, TE, Notre Dame
  58. Jalen Reagor, WR, TCU
  59. Bradlee Anae, EDGE, Utah
  60. Marlon Davidson, DL, Auburn
  61. Ashtyn Davis, S, Cal
  62. Ben Bartch, OT, St. John (Minn.)
  63. A.J. Terrell, CB, Clemson
  64. Julian Okwara, EDGE, Notre Dame
  65. Donovan Peoples-Jones, WR, Michigan
  66. Prince Tega Wanogho, OT, Auburn
  67. Troy Pride, CB, Notre Dame
  68. Jonathan Taylor, RB, Wisconsin (End of round 2 grades)
    I think there are going to be a few players worth spending a second round pick on that slip into the third. This second round is loaded with corners and receivers and it would not be a surprise to me to see a run on one or both position groups to happen during the round.
  69. Justin Mandubuike, DL, Texas A&M
  70. Adam Trautman, TE, Dayton
  71. Cam Akers, RB, Florida State
  72. Damon Arnette, CB, Ohio State
  73. Amik Robertson, CB, Louisiana Tech
  74. Jordyn Brooks, LB, Texas Tech
  75. Jalen Hurts, QB, Oklahoma
  76. Malik Harrison, LB, Ohio State
  77. Devin Duvernay, WR, Texas
  78. Cameron Dantzler, CB, Mississippi State
  79. Robert Hunt, OL, Louisiana
  80. Troy Dye, LB, Oregon
  81. Leki Fotu, DL, Utah
  82. Darrell Taylor, EDGE, Tennessee
  83. Terrell Burgess, S, Utah
  84. Larrell Murchison, DL, North Carolina State
  85. Van Jefferson, WR, Florida
  86. Jacob Eason, QB, Washington
  87. Kenny Willekes, EDGE, Michigan State
  88. K’Von Wallace, S, Clemson
  89. Thaddeus Moss, TE, LSU
  90. Terrell Lewis, EDGE, Alabama
  91. Eno Benjamin, RB, Arizona State
  92. Ben Bredeson, OL, Michigan
  93. K.J. Hill, WR, Ohio State
  94. Matt Peart, OT, UConn
  95. Jonah Jackson, OL, Ohio State
  96. Isaiah Wilson, OT, Georgia
  97. Logan Wilson, LB, Wyoming,
  98. Ezra Cleveland, OT, Boise State
  99. Davon Hamilton, DL, Ohio State
  100. Jake Fromm, QB, Georgia
  101. Brycen Hopkins, TE, Purdue
  102. Collin Johnson, WR, Texas
  103. Jonathan Grennard, EDGE, Florida
  104. Tyler Johnson, WR, Minnesota
  105. James Lynch, DL, Baylor (End of round 3 grades)
    There is a ton of third round talent available. 38 players by my estimation. This is definitely my cut off for players I would look to target on the first two days of the draft. I debated making the cut after Grennard, but Johnson and Lynch had such great years that it would be hard for me to pass on them if they were sitting there at the end of round three.
  106. Logan Stenberg, OL, Kentucky
  107. Jordan Elliott, DL, Missouri
  108. Bryan Edwards, WR, South Carolina
  109. Solomon Kindley, OL, Georgia
  110. Trevon Hill, EDGE, Miami
  111. K.J. Hamler, WR, Penn State
  112. Raekwon Davis, DL, Alabama
  113. Evan Weaver, LB, California
  114. Gabriel Davis, WR, UCF
  115. Darrynton Evans, RB, Appalachian State
  116. Akeem Davis-Gaither, LB, Appalachian State
  117. Jason Strowbridge, DL, UNC
  118. Julian Blackmon, S, Utah
  119. Willie Gay Jr., LB, Mississippi State
  120. Lynn Bowden, WR, Kentucky
  121. Ke’Shawn Vaughn, RB, Vanderbilt
  122. Josiah Deguara, TE, Cincinnati
  123. Quintez Cephus, WR, Wisconsin
  124. A.J. Green, CB, Oklahoma State
  125. Francis Bernard, LB, Utah
  126. Tanner Muse, S, Clemson
  127. David Woodward, LB, Utah State
  128. Shadiq Charles, OT, LSU
  129. Khalid Kareem, EDGE, Notre Dame
  130. Darnay Holmes, CB, UCLA
  131. Alohi Gilman, S, Notre Dame
  132. Isaiah Hodgins, WR, Oregon State
  133. Javelin Guidry, CB, Utah
  134. Alex Highsmith, EDGE, Charlotte
  135. Rashard Lawrence, DL, LSU
  136. Damien Lewis, OL, LSU
  137. Hunter Bryant, TE, Washington
  138. Netane Muti, OL, Fresno State
  139. Nick Harris, OL, Washington
  140. Quartney Davis, WR, Texas A&M
  141. Anthony Gordon, QB, Washington State
  142. Alton Robinson, EDGE, Syracuse
  143. Harrison Bryant, TE, FAU
  144. Nick Coe, EDGE, Auburn
  145. James Proche, WR, SMU
  146. Zach Moss, RB, Utah
  147. Brandon Jones, S, Texas
  148. Dane Jackson, CB, Pittsburgh (End of round 4 grades)
    This is where we start to get into players who can contribute on special teams or potentially have some red flags that pushed them down draft boards. The final three rounds are where we see teams start to take more risks on players from small schools or with unique physical traits they hope to develop.
  149. A.J. Dillon, RB, Boston College
  150. Antonio Ganady-Golden, WR, Liberty

So that’s my top 150 prospects! That should get you through at least the first two days of the draft. It is easy to get lost scrolling through that many names, so let’s break it down by position. There are even a couple of names on here that didn’t quite crack my top 150, but were my next favorite player in that position group.

Quarterback

  1. Joe Burrow, QB, LSU
  2. Tua Tagovailoa, QB, Alabama
  3. Justin Herbert, QB, Oregon
  4. Jordan Love, QB, Utah State
  5. Jalen Hurts, QB, Oklahoma
  6. Jacob Eason, QB, Washington
  7. Jake Fromm, QB, Georgia
  8. Anthony Gordan, QB, Washington State
  9. James Morgan, QB, Florida International
  10. Cole McDonald, QB, Hawaii

Running Back

  1. J.K. Dobbins, RB, Ohio State
  2. D’Andre Swift, RB, Georgia
  3. Clyde Edwards-Helaire, RB, LSU
  4. Jonathan Taylor, RB, Wisconsin
  5. Cam Akers, RB, Florida State
  6. Eno Benjamin, RB, Arizona State
  7. Darrynton Evans, RB, Appalachian State
  8. Ke’Shawn Vaughn, RB, Vanderbilt
  9. Zach Moss, RB, Utah
  10. A.J. Dillon, RB, Boston College
  11. Anthony McFarland, RB, Maryland
  12. Antonio Gibson, RB, Memphis
  13. Lamical Perine, RB, Florida
  14. James Robinson, RB, Southern Illinois
  15. Joshua Kelley, RB, UCLA

Wide Receiver

  1. Jerry Jeudy, WR, Alabama
  2. CeeDee Lamb, WR, Oklahoma
  3. Henry Ruggs, WR, Alabama
  4. Justin Jefferson, WR, LSU
  5. Tee Higgins, WR, Clemson
  6. Michael Pittman, WR, USC
  7. Denzel Mims, WR, Baylor
  8. Brandon Aiyuk, WR, Arizona State
  9. Laviska Shenault, WR, Colorado
  10. Chase Claypool, WR, Notre Dame
  11. Donovan Peoples-Jones, WR, Michigan
  12. Devin Duvernay, WR, Texas
  13. Van Jefferson, WR, Florida
  14. K.J. Hill, WR, Ohio State
  15. Collin Johnson, WR, Texas
  16. Tyler Johnson, WR, Minnesota
  17. Bryan Edwards, WR, South Carolina
  18. K.J. Hamler, WR, Penn State
  19. Gabriel Davis, WR, UCF
  20. Lynn Bowden, WR, Kentucky
  21. Quintez Cephus, WR, Wisconsin
  22. Isaiah Hodgins, WR, Oregon State
  23. Quartney Davis, WR, Texas A&M
  24. James Proche, WR, SMU
  25. Antonio Ganady-Golden, WR, Liberty

Offensive Tackle

  1. Tristan Wirfs, OT, Iowa
  2. Andrew Thomas, OT, Georgia
  3. Jedrick Wills, OT, Alabama
  4. Mekhi Becton, OT, Louisville
  5. Josh Jones, OT, Houston
  6. Austin Jackson, OT, USC
  7. Lucas Niang, OT, TCU
  8. Ben Bartch, OT, St. John (Minn.)
  9. Prince Tega Wanogho, OT, Auburn
  10. Matt Peart, OT, UConn
  11. Isaiah Wilson, OT, Georgia
  12. Ezra Cleveland, OT, Boise State
  13. Shadiq Charles, OT, LSU
  14. Jack Driscol, OT, Auburn
  15. Hakeem Adeniji, OT, Kansas

Interior Offensive Lineman

  1. Cesar Ruiz, OL, Michigan
  2. Matt Hennessy, OL, Temple
  3. Lloyd Cushenberry, OL, LSU
  4. Tyler Biadasz, OL, Wisconsin
  5. John Simpson, OL, Clemson
  6. Robert Hunt, OL, Lousiana
  7. Ben Bredeson, OL, Michigan
  8. Jonah Jackson, OL, Ohio State
  9. Logan Stenberg, OL, Kentucky
  10. Solomon Kindley, OL, Georgia
  11. Damien Lewis, OL, LSU
  12. Netane Muti, OL, Fresno State
  13. Nick Harris, OL, Washington
  14. Shane Lemieux, OL, Oregon
  15. Michael Onwenu, OL, Michigan

Tight End

  1. Cole Kmet, TE, Notre Dame
  2. Adam Trautman, TE, Dayton
  3. Thaddeus Moss, TE, LSU
  4. Brycen Hopkins, TE, Purdue
  5. Josiah Deguara, TE, Cincinnati
  6. Hunter Bryant, TE, Washington
  7. Harrison Bryant, TE, Florida Atlantic
  8. Albert Okwuegbunam, TE, Missouri
  9. Colby Parkinson, TE, Stanford
  10. Devin Asiasi, TE, UCLA

Edge Rusher

  1. Chase Young, EDGE, Ohio State
  2. K’Lavon Chaisson, EDGE, LSU
  3. Yetur Gross-Matos, EDGE, Penn State
  4. Josh Uche, EDGE, Michigan
  5. Curtis Weaver, EDGE, Boise State
  6. Bradlee Anae, EDGE, Utah
  7. Julian Okwara, EDGE, Notre Dame
  8. Darrell Taylor, EDGE, Tennessee
  9. Kenny Willekes, EDGE, Michigan State
  10. Terrell Lewis, EDGE, Alabama
  11. Jonathan Greenard, EDGE, Florida
  12. Trevon Hill, EDGE, Miami
  13. Khalid Kareem, EDGE, Notre Dame
  14. Alex Highsmith, EDGE, Charlotte
  15. Alton Robinson, EDGE, Syracuse
  16. Nick Coe, EDGE, Auburn
  17. Jabari Zuniga, EDGE, Florida
  18. Anfernee Jennings, EDGE, Alabama
  19. Kendall Coleman, EDGE, Syracuse
  20. Jonathan Garvin, EDGE, Miami

Defensive Lineman

  1. Javon Kinlaw, DL, South Carolina
  2. Derrick Brown, DL, Auburn
  3. A.J. Epenesa, DL, Iowa
  4. Ross Blacklock, DL, TCU
  5. Neville Gallimore, DL, Oklahoma
  6. Marlon Davidson, DL, Auburn
  7. Justin Madubuike, DL, Texas A&M
  8. Leki Fotu, DL, Utah
  9. Larrell Murchison, DL, North Carolina State
  10. Davon Hamilton, DL, Ohio State
  11. James Lynch, DL, Baylor
  12. Jordan Elliott, DL, Missouri
  13. Raekwon Davis, DL, Alabama
  14. Jason Strowbridge, DL, UNC
  15. Rashad Lawrence, DL, LSU

Linebacker

  1. Isaiah Simmons, LB/S, Clemson
  2. Patrick Queen, LB, LSU
  3. Kenneth Murray, LB, Oklahoma
  4. Jordyn Brooks, LB, Texas Tech
  5. Malik Harrison, LB, Ohio State
  6. Tory Dye, LB, Oregon
  7. Logan Wilson, LB, Wyoming
  8. Evan Weaver, LB, California
  9. Akeem Davis-Gaither, LB, Appalachian State
  10. Willie Gay Jr., LB, Mississippi State
  11. Francis Bernard, LB, Utah
  12. David Woodward, LB, Utah State
  13. Joe Bachie Jr., LB, Michigan State
  14. Justin Strnad, LB, Wake Forest
  15. Markus Bailey, LB, Purdue

Cornerback

  1. Jeff Okudah, CB, Ohio State
  2. Bryce Hall, CB, Virginia
  3. CJ Henderson, CB, Florida
  4. Jeff Gladney, CB, TCU
  5. Trevon Diggs, CB, Alabama
  6. Noah Igbinoghene, CB, Auburn
  7. Kristian Fulton, CB, LSU
  8. Jaylon Johnson, CB, Utah
  9. A.J. Terrell, CB, Clemson
  10. Troy Pride Jr., CB, Notre Dame
  11. Damon Arnette, CB, Ohio State
  12. Amik Robertson, CB, Louisiana Tech
  13. Cameron Dantzler, CB, Mississippi State
  14. A.J. Green, CB, Oklahoma State
  15. Darnay Holmes, CB, UCLA
  16. Javelin Guidry, CB, Utah
  17. Dane Jackson, CB, Pittsburgh
  18. Michael Ojumedia, CB, Iowa
  19. Harrison Hand, CB, Temple
  20. Kindle Vildor, CB, Georgia Southern

Safety

  1. Xavier McKinney, S, Alabama
  2. Grant Delpit, S, LSU
  3. Antoine Winfield, S, Minnesota
  4. Kyle Dugger, S, Lenoir Rhyne
  5. Jeremy Chinn, S, Southern Illinois
  6. Ashtyn Davis, S, California
  7. Terrell Burgess, S, Utah
  8. K’Von Wallace, S, Clemson
  9. Julian Blackmon, S, Utah
  10. Tanner Muse, S, Clemson
  11. Alohi Gilman, S, Notre Dame
  12. Brandon Jones, S, Texas
  13. J.R. Reed, S, Georgia
  14. Geno Stone, S, Iowa
  15. Antoine Brooks Jr., S, Maryland

And lastly, as a fun bonus, here is how I think each position group stacks up.

  1. Wide Receiver
    Incredible top-end talent, tons of depth. This is the best year to need a receiver in a long time. You can definitely find starting quality receivers in the third and fourth rounds in this draft. Devin Duvernay is my 12th ranked receiver, and I really like Duvernay!
  2. Offensive Tackle
    There has been a lot of talk about the top four tackles in this class. Honestly, I have a difficult time separating at least three of them. However, there are a couple of solid options beyond that quartet. The depth is not overwhelming, but there a number of interesting project players that should go in the middle rounds.
  3. Quarterback
    Joe Burrow stands head and shoulders above the rest. Tua Tagovailoa brings his injury concerns to the table, but comparison to Drew Brees feel apt. Justin Herbert checks all the boxes physically. If a coach can bring him up to speed on reading a defense and making the right decisions, he will thrive. In Jordan Love, some see Patrick Mahomes and others see JaMarcus Russell. He has tons of arm talent. I think comparing him to Josh Allen feels right.
  4. Defensive Tackle
    Javon Kinlaw and Derrick Brown headline this class, but there is a lot of depth. I have round three or better grades on 11 interior defensive linemen. Whether you need a nose tackle, a three-tech or a five-tech, just about every team can find the right fit for their system.
  5. Edge Rusher
    Chase Young is the cream of the crop, but there is a really wide gap between him and the rest of the class. The depth here is no inspiring. Most of this class comes with a lot of room to grow, or some major question marks about their ability to transition to the next level.
  6. Running Back
    At one point, this running back class looked like one of the best position groups of the 2020 draft. Then Travis Etienne, Najee Harris and Chuba Hubbard all returned to school, robbing this class of a lot of it’s depth. With no elite prospect to carry this group like an Ezekiel Elliott or Saquon Barkley, it’s solid, but unspectacular.
  7. Cornerback
    Much like the edge rushers, there is one great prospect at the top from Ohio State, and then a drop off. I’m not as high on CJ Henderson as most. The drop off from Okudah to Bryce Hall is steep. There a decent number of purely nickle corners, which I think hurts the overall depth of the group. There will be some solid starters to come out of the group, but the impact might take a few years to be felt.
  8. Linebacker
    Isaiah Simmons is an elite prospect, but does he really count as a linebacker. I think that is probably his best fit, so let’s say yes. Patrick Queen and Kenneth Murray earn first-round grades, but there is a massive drop from there. 49 spots to be exact. There are some interesting developmental options in the third and fourth rounds, but this group is lacking in proven talent.
  9. Safety
    This group is pretty thin even if you did include Isaiah Simmons as a safety. Xavier McKinney and Grant Delpit could end up in round one. There are a couple of small school studs in Kyle Dugger and Jeremy Chinn as well. Antoine Winfield Jr. is a wildcard as well given his size. Overall, I don’t think this is a great year to be looking for safety help.
  10. Interior Offensive Lineman
    This is a rough year for interior offensive line help. No one earned a first round grade from me and I don’t think I am alone in that conclusion. There is a run that should happen early in round two and some potential depth. It doesn’t help that the draft often doesn’t value the position, but I am unimpressed.
  11. Tight End
    I am not a fan of this tight end class. I don’t have a single one of them ranked in the top 50. There is some interesting depth down the line, but most of these guys are developmental prospects. I am not buying the ceiling on most of these players.

NFL Draft Big Board: Top 100 Post Senior Bowl

Senior Bowl week was awesome as we got to see some excellent standout players shine and others we weren’t familiar with take the big stage. Projected first round picks like Justin Herbert, Javon Kinlaw and Terrell Lewis showed up. Unheralded prospects like Kyle Dugger, Ben Bartch and Dane Jackson showed they were more than ready for the NFL. Overall, it was a great opportunity to evaluate these players in a different setting and see them put to the test against many others they are competing against to be drafted.

Between the College Football Playoff, East-West Shrine Bowl and Senior Bowl, a lot has changed since my last big board. While there are still plenty of questions left following the week, we now have a much better sense for where each player stands heading into the combine. There will be plenty more to learn and dissect following week-long event, but as we stand, here is my latest top 100 prospects.

  1. Ohio State LogoChase Young, EDGE, Ohio State
    Unquestionably the best prospect in the draft. About as polished as you could hope for as a pass rusher entering the league. Young does an excellent job against the run as well.
  2. Ohio State LogoJeff Okudah, CB, Ohio State
    The more I watch Jeff Okudah, the more I love what I see. He mirrors receivers so well and shows excellent closing speed to disrupt passes. He seals it with being a proven tackler as well.
  3. Alabama LogoJerry Jeudy, WR, Alabama
    This is one of, if not the best receiver class ever. It is headlined by Jerry Jeudy, who has showcased the speed, ability to separate and awareness to be an elite NFL receiver. He has had a few drops, but it looks like a fixable problem.
  4. Clemson LogoIsaiah Simmons, LB/S, Clemson
    You could start Isaiah Simmons in a lot of places. He could be an excellent off-ball linebacker or a ball hawking safety. His speed, instincts and football IQ make him an elite defensive prospect.
  5. LSU LogoJoe Burrow, QB, LSU
    After an incredible senior season, Joe Burrow will likely be the first overall pick. He has incredible mobility and excels at making plays outside the pocket. He doesn’t have the strongest arm, but he can still make plays down the field. His intermediate accuracy is scary good.
  6. Oklahoma LogoCeeDee Lamb, WR, Oklahoma
    If you want a player who can make something out of seemingly nothing, CeeDee Lamb is for you. Put on the film against Texas and you will see him simply willing himself to the end zone. He will have to prove he can generate separation at the next level, but his playmaking skill makes him an immediate starter.
  7. iowa_wordmarkA.J. Epenesa, EDGE, Iowa
    I list A.J. Epenesa as an edge player, but he could also kick inside as a five technique tackle. That versatility makes him an intriguing option for any team needing a disruptive defensive linemen. He played exceptionally well over his final few college games.
  8. Alabama LogoTua Tagovailoa, QB, Alabama
    Were it not for the injury, Tua Tagovailoa would push Joe Burrow for the top quarterback taken in 2020. As it stands, there are major red flags regarding Tua’s durability. When healthy, he reminds many of a southpaw Drew Brees.
  9. Georgia LogoAndrew Thomas, OT, Georgia
    When you turn on tape of Andrew Thomas, you see someone with the power to be an high-level starter in the pros. He struggles at times with speed rushers, but he has the frame and technique to start right away.
  10. Alabama LogoHenry Ruggs, WR, Alabama
    Meet the fastest player in this draft. One of the most exciting things about the upcoming combine will be if Henry Ruggs threatens the 40-yard dash record. He is a complete receiver and decent size given his explosiveness.
  11. Auburn_Tigers_logoDerrick Brown, DL, Auburn
    I’m not as high on Derrick Brown as most. He has shown flashes of being a game-wrecker, but he is too inconsistent as a pass rusher for me. However, he might be the best interior lineman against the run in this class.
  12. South Carolina logoJavon Kinlaw, DL, South Carolina
    Javon Kinlaw essentially ran unchecked through Mobile. He bolstered what already an impressive draft stock and proved he is a great interior rusher. If he measures well at the combine and shows some good agility in the three cone drill, he could move ahead of Brown.
  13. Clemson LogoTee Higgins, WR, Clemson
    The biggest knock on Tee Higgins is his inability to separate. I think that has been overblown and his catch radius should limit those concerns anyway. There might not be a better jump ball player in this draft.
  14. iowa_wordmarkTristan Wirfs, OL, Iowa
    I think Tristan Wirfs projects best as an interior lineman, but he does have some experience at both tackle positions. He moves well for a player his size. He is a more polished version of Mekhi Becton.
  15. Alabama LogoJedrick Wills, OT, Alabama
    While he might not be as physically imposing as the other tackles projected in the first round, Jedrick Wills is the best pass blocker of the bunch. He isn’t a mauler, but he is technically sound and pro ready.
  16. Ohio State LogoJ.K. Dobbins, RB, Ohio State
    Few running backs have the blend of speed and power J.K. Dobbins possesses. He will likely go a lot later than this on draft day, but he is that talented. Position value will just cause him to slide.
  17. Oklahoma LogoKenneth Murray, LB, Oklahoma
    The NFL continues to trend towards smaller, faster linebackers. Kenneth Murray fits the mold of the new prototype. His speed alone makes him an impact player. He wraps up well and with a little refining in coverage, he should be a three-down player.
  18. colorado_buffaloes_alternate_logoLaviska Shenault Jr., WR, Colorado
    Laviska Shenault gets lost in the shuffle of the big name receivers in this draft. Prior to a banged up 2019 season, Shenault dominated the Pac-12 in 2018. He is athletic and has some interesting positional diversity. Colorado used him as a wildcat quarterback just to get the ball in his hands more.
  19. LSU LogoJustin Jefferson, WR, LSU
    No player benefited more from Joe Burrow’s Heisman season than Justin Jefferson. He thrust himself into the first round conversation with an incredible statistical season. He has the size and physical skills to be a No. 1 receiver in the NFL.
  20. Oregon logoJustin Herbert, QB, Oregon
    There are still some questions regarding Justin Herbert, but he showed he could be a leader at the Senior Bowl. He showcased his arm talent once again. His mobility makes him a dynamic option who could develop into a Pro-Bowl-level quarterback.
  21. Wisconsin logoTyler Biadasz, OL, Wisconsin
    Teams looking for a plug and play center will be doing their homework on Tyler Biadasz. He is a grinder and has put together some excellent tape. He had hip surgery at the end of the year, which is certainly a red flag. How he tests at the combine could solidify his first round status or drop him out of the top 50.
  22. Penn State logoYetur Gross-Matos, EDGE, Penn State
    Yetur Gross-Matos put together another solid season following an impressive 2018 campaign. He has the size to play as a 4-3 or a 3-4 outside linebacker. He should be a situational pass rusher from Day 1.
  23. LSU LogoGrant Delpit, S, LSU
    In terms of diagnosing plays and putting himself in position to succeed, Grant Delpit is a great player. He struggles to always make those plays though. A clear inability to wrap up showed up on film this year and he needs to improve his angles downfield.
  24. LSU LogoKristian Fulton, CB, LSU
    Often overshadowed by Derrick Stingley Jr., Kristian Fulton has the physical tools to develop into a No. 1 corner. He tracks the ball well in the air and will make some plays in coverage. He still has to iron out some inconsistencies and show he can handle the pressure of being picked on.
  25. Alabama LogoXavier McKinney, S, Alabama
    For teams looking for an aggressive safety, Xavier McKinney checks a lot of the desired boxes. He measures in well and he can play up near the line. He is comfortable stepping into the slot occasionally as well.
  26. Louisville logoMekhi Becton, OT, Louisville
    Mekhi Becton is a behemoth. He is 6’7″ and roughly 365 pounds. His power in absolutely incredible. He is also incredibly raw. His potential is huge, but he definitely needs a decent amount of work before he can be trusted as a starter.
  27. Alabama LogoTerrell Lewis, EDGE, Alabama
    After a solid week in Mobile, Terrell Lewis is showing some depth to his game in addition to just being a pass rusher. He played some off-ball linebacker and flashed his athleticism. Testing well could see him crack the top 20.
  28. Florida logoCJ Henderson, CB, Florida
    At times, CJ Henderson looks ready to make the jump. At others, Henderson can look overmatched and out of position. He breaks well on the ball and uses his hands well to break up passes. He needs to improve his press coverage.
  29. Georgia LogoD’Andre Swift, RB, Georgia
    The hype around Georgia’s offense dipped in the second half of the year. Word is injury slowed down D’Andre Swift during the drop off. I want to see him compete at full health at the combine to see how dynamic he can truly be.
  30. Utah_Utes_logoBradlee Anae, EDGE, Utah
    This is my biggest draft crush at this point. Bradlee Anae jumped out on tape over the past month of the season and dominated the Senior Bowl. He showed out in the game and has a first round grade from me at the moment.
  31. LSU LogoK’Lavon Chaisson, EDGE, LSU
    As a pass rusher, K’Lavon Chaisson is a speed rusher with decent power. The thing that bothers me is how bad he is against the run. He never keeps contain and will get dragged for extra yardage.
  32. USC logoMichael Pittman, WR, USC
    Another Senior Bowl standout here. He sat out Saturday’s game with an ankle injury, but he balled out in practice. Michael Pittman lacks blazing speed, but he can still separate and projects as an excellent possession receiver.
  33. 800px-virginia_cavaliers_wordmarkBryce Hall, CB, Virginia
    Prior to an ankle injury, Bryce Hall was playing like a first round pick for Virginia. If he can get healthy by the combine, he could work his way back into the first round.
  34. Alabama LogoTrevon Diggs, CB, Alabama
    Trevon Diggs has the size and speed that NFL teams love. However, he has some rough games on film. There were a lot of corners torched by LSU, but it still shows Diggs has some growing to do.
  35. 350px-utah_state_aggies_logo.svg_Jordan Love, QB, Utah State
    One of the most controversial prospects in this class, I think Jordan Love would be an excellent value in the late first round or early second round. His arm talent is impressive. His decision making and inability to move through his reads is concerning.
  36. Oklahoma LogoNeville Gallimore, DL, Oklahoma
    Few players bring the type of savvy Neville Gallimore has. He should be a high floor, starting option early in his career. He looked sharp during Senior Bowl week.
  37. LSU LogoPatrick Queen, LB, LSU
    I still have a lot more film to break down on Patrick Queen after expecting him to return to school for most of the year. While I think he is currently being overhyped, showing up on a big stage is promising.
  38. logo_of_university_of_houston_athleticsJosh Jones, OT, Houston
    One of the clear winners from Senior Bowl week, Josh Jones is now generating first round buzz. He solidifies himself in that second tier of tackles. His potential and grit are enticing.
  39. 237px-arizona_state_sun_devils_baseball_logo.svg_Brandon Aiyuk, WR, Arizona State
    Unfortunately, Brandon Aiyuk was forced to sit out Senior Bowl week with an injury. His production from his senior year has some talking about him being a first round pick. He gets vertical and stacks defensive backs well to make big plays downfield.
  40. 1280px-boise_state_22b22_logo.svg_Curtis Weaver, EDGE, Boise State
    One of the most consistent players in college football over the past three years, Curtis Weaver finished his junior year with 13.5 sacks and a career total 34. I’m eager to see him at the combine.
  41. 250px-tcu_horned_frogs_logo.svg_Jalen Reagor, WR, TCU
    Speedy playmakers that play above the rim are a commodity. Jalen Reagor had a dominant 2018 season before taking a step back this year. If he can clean up the drops at the combine, he should have enough physical skill to standout in a loaded draft class.
  42. Wisconsin logoZach Baun, LB, Wisconsin
    Zach Baun completely changed the scouting report on himself during Senior Bowl week. After spending his time at Wisconsin as an edge rusher, he showed his versatility and coachability by moving to linebacker. He could draw first round interest.
  43. 300px-california_golden_bears_logo.svg_Ashtyn Davis, S, California
    As a track star at California, Ashtyn Davis could stand out at the combine. He missed out on the Senior Bowl with an injury. He still has some questions to answer about his ability to cover at the next level.
  44. Notre Dame LogoJulian Okwara, EDGE, Notre Dame
    After wrapping a solid if unspectacular career at Notre Dame, Julian Okwara is a player capable of making an early impact. He failed to take a step forward during his senior year, but he has some potential to develop into a consistent pass rusher.
  45. 250px-tcu_horned_frogs_logo.svg_Ross Blacklock, DL, TCU
    I am still in the early stages of breaking down film on Ross Blacklock. He has great size and holds his position well. More to come on him.
  46. USC logoAustin Jackson, OT, USC
    Prior to his bowl game, there was some first round hype around Austin Jackson. That died down after he struggled to keep up with A.J. Epenesa. He has the physical tools to develop into a starting left tackle.
  47. Wisconsin logoJonathan Taylor, RB, Wisconsin
    From a talent perspective, Jonathan Taylor is near the top of the class. However, he has a ton of mileage on his legs and issues with fumbling. That makes it harder to justify picking him.
  48. MichiganWolverinesDonovan Peoples-Jones, WR, Michigan
    It is becoming more and more apparent that his lack of production was likely linked to Shea Patterson. He should be an intriguing option to improve in a new offense.
  49. Notre Dame LogoCole Kmet, TE, Notre Dame
    I am still working on catching up on Cole Kmet film after he changed his draft decision. He shows good hands and has the size NFL teams want at the position.
  50. 212px-temple_t_logo.svg_Matt Hennessy, OL, Temple
    Matt Hennessey won’t overwhelm anyone with his power, but he fits well into any zone scheme. He has no problem sprinting out on reach blocks and picking up players in the second level.
  51. 250px-tcu_horned_frogs_logo.svg_Jeff Gladney, CB, TCU
    He doesn’t jump off the page from a measurable or statistical standpoint, but Jeff Gladney is consistent and crafty. He understands how to position himself well to make plays. Would love to see him come up with a few more interceptions.
  52. MichiganWolverinesCesar Ruiz, OL, Michigan
    Projects as a starting center at the next level. Cesar Ruiz has the size you want for an interior linemen.
  53. Clemson LogoJohn Simpson, G, Clemson
    About as battle tested as they come. John Simpson played in back-to-back championship games and held up well against some very good competition.
  54. Auburn_Tigers_logoMarlon Davidson, DL, Auburn
    I am still a little uncertain what Marlon Davidson’s best fit in the NFL will be. He lined up all over the place for Auburn. That type of versatility is something to work with.
  55. Penn State logoKJ Hamler, WR, Penn State
    I am much lower on the Penn State speedster than most. I don’t see KJ Hamler as being much more than an average slot receiver. His speed is his best quality.
  56. Auburn_Tigers_logoPrince Tega Wangho, OT, Auburn
    He was put through the ringer at times blocking in the SEC. He still has some room to grow, but I like his ability in pass protection.
  57. Florida logoJonathan Greenard, EDGE, Florida
    He isn’t too flashy, but he works hard and understands his assignments. Greenard made a good impression after transferring from Louisville to Florida.
  58. Ohio State LogoMalik Harrison, LB, Ohio State
    A downhill playmaker, Malik Harrison is a fun prospect. He made a lot of disruptive plays. He still has to grow as a block shedder and coverage option.
  59. LSU LogoLloyd Cushenberry, OL, LSU
    He struggled through the College Football Playoff, but put together a solid week in Mobile. He has some plug and play potential.
  60. Ohio State LogoDamon Arnette, CB, Ohio State
    Clearly not as well known as Ohio State’s other corners, Damon Arnette played a solid final game of his college career. He can press well and could develop into an outside option.
  61. Utah_Utes_logoLeki Fotu, DL, Utah
    He is a massive man playing in the middle of defensive lines. Leki Fotu has excellent burst off the line as a pass rusher. He has a ways to go with his technique and stamina.
  62. Washington Huskies logoJacob Eason, QB, Washington
    The strong-arm quarterback from Washington has more questions than answers. His lack of mobility is concerning, but Jacob Eason’s arm talent should see him go on Day 2.
  63. Oregon logoTroy Dye, LB, Oregon
    A tough and fast linebacker, Troy Dye is a bit undersized even by today’s expectations. He fights through traffic well, but needs to up his play strength.
  64. vanderbilt_commodoresJared Pickney, TE, Vanderbilt
    Jared Pickney is the most well-rounded tight end in this class. He is a solid blocker and showed his chops as a pass catcher. His play is consistently above average.
  65. MichiganWolverinesJosh Uche, EDGE, Michigan
    Much like Bradlee Anae, Josh Uche had an excellent showing at the Senior Bowl. He showed his speed off the edge consistently. Uche hasn’t shown a whole lot of other ways he can win though.
  66. Alabama LogoRaekwon Davis, DL, Alabama
    From a traits perspective, Raekwon Davis checks every box. From a production and reliability standpoint, Davis has been a did. He has gone backwards in his final two years at Alabama.
  67. LSU LogoClyde Edwards-Helaire, RB, LSU
    Maurice Jones-Drew 2.0 showcased his bruising running style en route to a national title. Clyde Edwards-Helaire can catch the ball out of the backfield as well. His top speed is average at best, but he has a clear role to play.
  68. Baylor logoDenzel Mims, WR, Baylor
    Part of Baylor’s surprising resurgence this season, Denzel Mims proved he is a playmaker. He has excellent body control and seems to be improving as a route runner.
  69. 320px-dayton_flyers_winged-d_logo_redAdam Trautman, TE, Dayton
    Another riser from Senior Bowl week, Adam Trautman showed off some solid hands and decent blocking skills. He made some ground in this deepish tight end group.
  70. MichiganWolverinesBen Bredeson, G, Michigan
    Ben Bredeson had an uneven week in Mobile, with a couple of poor reps in 1-on-1 drills. However, he also flashed some solid technique and could develop into a quality option.
  71. Texas A&M logoJustin Manduibuike, DL, Texas A&M
    He showed up on tape for Texas A&M right away. He is relentless in his pursuit, but needs to improve at reading his keys.
  72. Texas_Longhorns_logoDevin Duvernay, WR, Texas
    Pretty much every receiver had a good week in Mobile, but I am really starting to like Devin Duvernay. He looks like a quality slot receiver with good route running ability. His film over Texas’ final few games is impressive.
  73. 176px-purdue_boilermakers_logo.svg_Brycen Hopkins, TE, Purdue
    My assessment of Brycen Hopkins is still very incomplete. At times, he looks like the best tight end in this draft. At others, he looks like a backup at best.
  74. uconn_logo1Matt Peart, OT, UConn
    Matt Peart might be the best of the project tackles in this class. His size and length make him a fun prospect to work with.
  75. Georgia LogoJake Fromm, QB, Georgia
    A lack of arm strength limits Jake Fromm’s upside. He is very cerebral and poised, but lacks the zip to hit tight windows or stretch the field.
  76. Auburn_Tigers_logoNoah Igbinoghene, CB, Auburn
    He is starting to generate some buzz. When I watch him, I see good speed and excellent use of the sideline to help him in coverage, limiting the space for receivers. He still has some work to do with his technique.
  77. Washington Huskies logoTrey Adams, OT, Washington
    When totally healthy, Trey Adams should be in the conversation with Josh Jones and Austin Jackson. A checkered injury history and shaky movement skills knock him down a lot.
  78. 250px-tcu_horned_frogs_logo.svg_Lucas Niang, OT, TCU
    Projecting as a right tackle, Lucas Niang has the size you want. He is pretty powerful, but still underdeveloped. He missed most of the year with an injury.
  79. redraiderlogoJordyn Brooks, LB, Texas Tech
    This is someone I could see rising up my board. He has good speed and can run with backs out of the backfield. He is smart with how he attacks opposing quarterbacks.
  80. Utah_Utes_logoJaylon Johnson, CB, Utah
    While he has some better moments, it is hard for me to get past the film against USC. Jaylon Johnson has no interest as a tackler and is still developing in coverage.
  81. Florida State LogoCam Akers, RB, Florida State
    Cam Akers is the type of player you can expect to improve in the NFL after getting out of that terrible Florida State offense. He should carve out a role early on with some potential to take over as a starter down the line.
  82. Michigan State logoKenny Willekes, EDGE, Michigan State
    He won’t wow you with his athleticism, but he grinds down opposing offensive linemen and finds way to be productive. Kenny Willekes could end up being a steal.
  83. 1000px-mississippi_state_bulldogs_logo.svg_Cameron Dantzler, CB, Mississippi State
    As a proven tackler, Cameron Dantzler will be on some teams boards for that reason alone. If he can refine his approach as a man corner, he will turn into a quality corner.
  84. Ohio State LogoKJ Hill, WR, Ohio State
    KJ Hill had an excellent week in Mobile, showing his route running ability. He still needs to work on generating separation earlier in his routes, but he is crafty.
  85. Clemson LogoA.J. Terrell, CB, Clemson
    What is the opposite of recency bias? A.J. Terrell got torched in a variety of ways in the national championship game. He is definitely a project player with some upside.
  86. 300px-california_golden_bears_logo.svg_Evan Weaver, LB, Cal
    Evan Weaver led the country in tackles this year. He has a nose for the football and contributes on special teams.
  87. Notre Dame LogoChase Claypool, WR, Notre Dame
    With teams looking to find red zone specialists, Chase Claypool should draw some interest. He has a big body and adjusts well to balls in the air.
  88. Ben Bartch, OT, St. John’s
    He came out to play with the big boys and did not disappoint. Ben Bartch has a steep learning curve ahead, but looks like a future starting tackle.
  89. Notre Dame LogoTroy Pride Jr., CB, Notre Dame
    As far as speed goes, Troy Pride showed at the Senior Bowl that he can run with anyone. Someone will take a chance on him with the hope of developing the rest of his game.
  90. Alabama LogoAnfernee Jennings, LB, Alabama
    I was surprised to see Anfernee Jennings listed as an inside linebacker on the Senior Bowl roster. I’m not sure how much upside I really see in a position switch for him.
  91. 320px-pittpanthersDane Jackson, CB, Pittsburgh
    He might not go to a small school, but Dane Jackson still came from way off the radar with his performance in Mobile. He made a really positive impression that is going to force me to watch some film on him.
  92. Florida logoVan Jefferson, WR, Florida
    This is much more of a traits thing than anything else. Van Jefferson didn’t have elite college production, but he showed in Mobile that he can make contested catches and find ways to create a window for quarterbacks to throw into.
  93. 1000px-north_carolina_state_university_athletic_logo.svg_Larrell Murchison, DL, NC State
    NC State seems to produce solid defensive linemen every year. Larrell Murchison should just continue the trend. He had a decent Senior Bowl week. I will be revisiting his film before the combine.
  94. 512px-oklahoma_state_university_athletics_logo_28four_colors29.svg_A.J. Green, CB, Oklahoma State
    Not to be confused with the injured Bengals receiver, A.J. Green made a name for himself at the Senior Bowl. He rose to the challenge of facing the incredible receivers in attendance and fared well.
  95. Kyle Dugger, S, Lenoir Rhyne
    I don’t even know where Lenoir Rhyne is, but I can tell you Kyle Dugger is an NFL-caliber player. He had some really nice moments in Mobile and acclimated nicely to the speed.
  96. Baylor logoJames Lynch, DL, Baylor
    After a fantastic season where he was named Big 12 defensive player of the year, James Lynch still seems like a mid round player. His production was impressive, but his upside and measurables are less so.
  97. Kentucky logoLogan Stenberg, G, Kentucky
    He didn’t stand out as much during Senior Bowl week, but he did nothing to hurt his stock. Logan Stenberg has some solid film in the SEC to fall back on.
  98. Washington Huskies logoNick Harris, C, Washington
    Pretty much everyone I have talked about had a good week in Mobile. Nick Harris did not. He got bullied in 1-on-1 drills. His tape is more promising, but this exposed some clear weaknesses.
  99. Georgia LogoIsaiah Wilson, OT, Georgia
    The other Georgia offensive tackle, Isaiah Wilson is all about his traits. He has the size and frame to develop into a starting option. He faced good competition, but he never stood out.
  100. 237px-arizona_state_sun_devils_baseball_logo.svg_Eno Benjamin, RB, Arizona State
    Eno Benjamin is a shifty running back I could see rising up boards at the combine. He played on a middling Arizona State team that didn’t get much press. He could start to work his way into the top five conversation with a good showing in Indianapolis.For more NFL Draft coverage, check out the Aftermath’s NFL Draft Podcast, with new episodes every Thursday.